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Tying Up / EPSM

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Mr Prospector View Drop Down
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    Posted: 11 Mar 2016 at 11:18am
Ive just had a filly in work diagnosed with a tying up problem via blood tests .Ive never had a horse with this issue before and was looking for ideas outlining a full treatment protocol for this issue .

I am interested not only in a standard drug protocol but an full exercise program and a full feed/diet that may be required to help this type of horse . 

Stables these days will fall back on standard vet advice , but my feeling is this is not the real solution and changing the exercise and diet programs may give much better results . Ive noted previously a stable that had really good results with fillies with tying up and walking was a major part of their treatment and id like to find out how much walking they do ,when they do it and and for how long etc ..

thanks


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Isaac soloman View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Isaac soloman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Mar 2016 at 1:15pm
Firstly i would have thought it would be observation and not a blood test alerting you to the problem. A blood test will show the severity of the tying up.
Second, management via exercise, every day, no days off, and diet, cut back on grains/concentrates on light exercise days much better than a protocol of drugs. 
Third, this is a problem from time immemorial, occurring since horses were broken in and put into carts, and  so although there are advances it hasnt been cured!, so horses are still flesh and blood , and old fashioned.
forth, research and good luck telling your trainer, and vet!
Sympathetic handlers isna must. Its not nice trying to force a horse to move "having an episode"

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GAJ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Mar 2016 at 1:38pm
I have a theory it may be related to a gluten intolerance, though don't have any firm evidence of this till my filly starts racing again (about 4 weeks off). So no Barley, oats or wheat products,(These are in most pre mixed racehorse feeds and pellets.) Sticking only to Rice, Corn and oils. Sprouted seed should be OK.
A friend of mine had success with feeding only boiled corn and rice bran (100% rice bran) and oils as fuel source, no Lucerne was given either.
As many people are gluten intolerant so may be horses. I have removed all gluten containing grains from her diet. Time will tell.
I have also heard not to trot them! Don't know why?
 
This is an article written about a supplement called astaxanthin, given with L-cartinine.
 
Interesting, though the product is very expensive and you have to be careful where you buy it as there are many manufacturers making false astaxanthin, so expect to pay from $300/kg for the real stuff.
We take it every day ourselves and are considering buying it for the horses.
 
Also there are different types of tying up, so one cure may not cure all types of problems.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gay3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Mar 2016 at 2:25pm
A few threads that may help:
http://forum.thoroughbredvillage.com.au/search_results_posts.asp?SearchID=20160311030650&KW=tying+up

I've had several females with a 100% prevention rate once I knew they were tying up. Things to consider &/or implement:

Highly strung? Find out the reason, pain? Fully check using more than one professional if they find nothing.
Change of rider to a quieter one often helps as does environment e.g. less track work.
Pacifiers often help as they dull the vision a little as does working them in the dark.
Keep work even i.e. do some pacework on slow days at least 3fur & no total days off if possible.
Feed the work, Monday morning sickness is a self explanatory expression.
Diet: Google laminitis diet, they go hand in hand. Low or no starch & sugar = no cereal grains or hay. Pulses are fine (beans/peas/lupins) as are soy hulls, beet pulp & more often than not, lucerne hay, stalky being preferable. Bob Hoysted told me the latter is all they could feed a champion filly his father trained.
Ideally train from paddock with at least one friend keeps them happier & moving more.
Weir stopped swimming his tying up ones post work which makes perfect sense when you realise they have to keep going to survive so it further damages muscle tissue.
Kynoselen twice /wk helps as does 20mls immediately post work.
I personally don't put them on the walker if there's the slightest chance they might've or are in the process of seizing up, again for fear of more damage.
That's about all I can think of for now but you will find some weird & wonderful 'never fails' products/potions on the net if you look hard enough. Solid, commonsense husbandry will correct 95% of cases. BOL Smile
Experience is something you gain a few minutes after you could have used it!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mr Prospector Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Mar 2016 at 2:28pm
Thanks for the replies
Isaac - the fillies outward symptoms were diffuse,mild and non specific with a sore back the only real clinical evidence , I suspected a subclinical level due to mild stiffness and an uncomfortable movement and she come up with mild colic after the last race .
I asked the trainer to get the vet out to blood test and this confirmed that tying up is definitely an issue . She won't perform unless we can deal with the symptoms and I'm looking for a definative exercise regime . Some trainers are very inflexible and just want owners to butt out but ours is fairly good .
GAJ - I'm really interested in your theory in regard to gluten and would appreciate finding out how your experiment goes with the change in diet . Can you please keep me updated ? .
I'm also not sure what the stats are but the problem is almost exclusively a female issue (do hormones have an
effect?).
I have been told that putting them on regulate can help alleviate the symptoms but is not a cure ,so it may be a case of seeing what works .
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Mr Prospector Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Mar 2016 at 8:52am
Thanks Gay as usual , sorry I couldn't find the previous thread . It definitely appears that a radical change in diet is needed in regard to grains and your results are fantastic btw .
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GAJ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Apr 2016 at 1:13pm
Just an update on our filly we started on a gluten free diet, she raced yesterday at Ballina in a maiden first up from a spell, she was strong to the line and managed to come third only 1.6L off the winner, so happy she is feeling better. Her name is Rougissante.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Sister Dot Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Sep 2018 at 12:28am
Originally posted by Gay3 Gay3 wrote:

A few threads that may help:
http://forum.thoroughbredvillage.com.au/search_results_posts.asp?SearchID=20160311030650&KW=tying+up

I've had several females with a 100% prevention rate once I knew they were tying up. Things to consider &/or implement:

Highly strung? Find out the reason, pain? Fully check using more than one professional if they find nothing.
Change of rider to a quieter one often helps as does environment e.g. less track work.
Pacifiers often help as they dull the vision a little as does working them in the dark.
Keep work even i.e. do some pacework on slow days at least 3fur & no total days off if possible.
Feed the work, Monday morning sickness is a self explanatory expression.
Diet: Google laminitis diet, they go hand in hand. Low or no starch & sugar = no cereal grains or hay. Pulses are fine (beans/peas/lupins) as are soy hulls, beet pulp & more often than not, lucerne hay, stalky being preferable. Bob Hoysted told me the latter is all they could feed a champion filly his father trained.
Ideally train from paddock with at least one friend keeps them happier & moving more.
Weir stopped swimming his tying up ones post work which makes perfect sense when you realise they have to keep going to survive so it further damages muscle tissue.
Kynoselen twice /wk helps as does 20mls immediately post work.
I personally don't put them on the walker if there's the slightest chance they might've or are in the process of seizing up, again for fear of more damage.
That's about all I can think of for now but you will find some weird & wonderful 'never fails' products/potions on the net if you look hard enough. Solid, commonsense husbandry will correct 95% of cases. BOL Smile

replacing part of the grain with oil as an energy source has been reported to help a lot. I had a mare that could eat oats all day, but even small amounts of corn caused her to the up within hours
“Where in this wide world can man find nobility without pride, friendship without envy, or beauty without vanity? Here where grace is laced with muscle and strength by gentleness confined”
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Sister Dot Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Sep 2018 at 12:29am
Tie up
“Where in this wide world can man find nobility without pride, friendship without envy, or beauty without vanity? Here where grace is laced with muscle and strength by gentleness confined”
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