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mc41 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mc41 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Dec 2015 at 9:32am
year ago today, Malcolm Turnbull bought back the old copper network that John Howard sold last century. On the same day he also bought an old HFC network that Optus planned to decommission years ago.

12 months on it is very clear that these were both bad decisions made without proper due diligence.

Two weeks ago a leaked NBN Co internal document revealed that the cost of fixing up the old copper network to make it work has blown out by more than 1,000 per cent.

In December 2013 Malcolm Turnbull said the cost to repair the copper would be $55 million. This leaked document reveals it has now blown out to $641 million.

Most people don't get promoted for blowing their budget by 1,000 percent, but Malcolm Turnbull has.

Three weeks ago another leaked NBN Co internal document revealed that the Optus HFC network that Malcolm Turnbull acquired 12 months ago today is not "fit for purpose" and NBN Co will need to spend hundreds of millions of dollars to fix it up or overbuild it.

After a bit over two years in charge of the NBN Malcolm Turnbull's mismanagement of the NBN is now becoming very clear:

The cost of the NBN has almost doubled - he promised he could build it for $29.5 billion, this has now blown out to $56 billion;
The time it will take to build the NBN has also doubled - he promised everyone would have access to the NBN by the end of next year, this has now blown out to 2020; and
Now the cost of fixing the copper he bought 12 months ago today has blown out by more than 1,000 per cent.
Malcolm Turnbull is pretty agile, but he can't blame anybody else for this but himself.

These are his mistakes and his stuff ups. This is his mess.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mc41 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Dec 2015 at 8:40am
It gets better
NBN buys the copper network,now this BS

Telstra will be paid by NBN to fix faults in its copper network under a new deal signed by the pair today
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mc41 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Jan 2016 at 4:42pm
Here is a surprise 😳😳
A researcher from Monash University has published a detailed analysis of the NBN company’s costs which appears to show that Labor’s technically superior Fibre to the Premises model represents better financial value than the Coalition’s preferred Fibre to the Node technology only a scant few years after FTTP was deployed.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ExceedAndExcel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Jan 2016 at 4:53pm
I miss Questions.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Passing Through Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Jan 2016 at 5:04pm
He is in a bunker somewhere in Warringah helping orchestrate the undermining of the demon commie Turnbull, and a successful coup to return to The Lodge his beloved Tones.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Beliskner Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Jan 2016 at 5:13pm
Why is Abbott so despised by the lefties?

He said stupid gelati now and then, but aside from that, what was the actual beef with him?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Passing Through Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Jan 2016 at 5:21pm
It wasn't lefties that voted him out of the top job, it was the Liberal Party room. They dumped a first term PM. Why did they deem him unsuited to the top job?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Beliskner Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Jan 2016 at 6:17pm
Yeah i know that, but even before he was PM, he just copped it again and again and again, i can't believe it was just for saying stupid gelati, am i missing some huge kiss up he made?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Passing Through Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Jan 2016 at 6:38pm
He represented something Australia isn't, unfair and intolerant. His attacks on egalitarianism through his unfair budgets and on multicultural Australia through his relentless terror fear campaign designed to divide us, was what the left expected of him and got in their view. He is a man of a time long past in Australian politics and his attempt to take us back there was rejected. He proved even too far right for his own party in the end.  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Passing Through Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jan 2016 at 11:36am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Passing Through Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jan 2016 at 11:38am
This is the Reddit Q&A he did yesterday answering any question put to him on this. Sorry, you will have to right click - go to. The link won't work here

 https://www.reddit.com/r/IAmA/comments/410n4q/i_am_outgoing_abc_technology_editor_nick_ross_ama/
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mc41 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Jan 2016 at 11:59am

independent telco analyst Paul Budde predicts 2016 will be the make or break year for the MTM NBN as the reality of re-using the copper and pay TV networks is revealed.

"After another two years of delays and several cost blowouts ... we will see if the old infrastructure can be cranked up to provide a high-speed broadband service that would lift us from the 46th position on the international ladder of broadband quality."

The Telstra deal comes after two damaging leaks about key components of the MTM NBN. The first leak revealed that Optus' pay TV (HFC) network may need to be rebuilt by extending Telstra's HFC footprint or replacing it with fibre because it is not "fit for purpose" according to internal Nbn documents. The Nbn calculates that this could add $150–375 million dollars to the cost of the network and cause significant delays.

Nbn said that this was just part of "scenario planning" and that it's completed an HFC trial in Redcliffe, Qld without unexpected technical issues with the Optus network.

The second leak revealed that Telstra's copper network will need significant remediation work to repair and replace sections not up to standard. That could cost up to $640 million because of a 10-fold increase in the cost of repairing the copper node connections.

Nbn downplayed the revelations and said that the increased cost of the fibre to the node (FTTN) construction was accounted for in the latest corporate plan and 550,000 FTTN connections are under construction.

2016: crunch time for the NBN

The government first promised the NBN would deliver speeds of between 25 and 100Mbps by the end of 2016 and 50 to 100Mbps by 2019, when the network would be complete, for a cost of $29.5 billion. It will now provide at least 25Mbps to all premises by 2020 for a cost of up to $56 billion. Labor's plan was to build a full-fibre FTTH network that was expected to cost $45 billion and be completed by 2021.

Budde has long maintained it's a missed opportunity for Australia. "The sad story is that it now looks like the fibre to the home (FTTH) network could have been delivered for a price not that far different from the second-rate system that we are getting. The people and businesses of Australia have never been concerned about the cost of this long-term national infrastructure project, instead they have argued – do it once and do it right."

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mc41 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Jan 2016 at 3:39pm
Gets sadder by the day with our PM leading this disaster

news The nation’s largest telco Telstra today said regulatory decisions made by the Government were forcing it to install brand new copper in new greenfields estates, rather than the next-generation fibre-optic cables which many Australians would expect in new developments.

The Department of Communications recently published new statistics which show that Telstra has deployed brand new copper to hundreds of new development premises around Australia as they are being built. The figures, first reported by NBN blogger Kenneth Tsang, show that about 420 new developments around Australia have recently received new copper connections provided by Telstra.

The copper deployments appear to make no technical sense.

In 2016, copper telecommunications infrastructure is considered legacy infrastructure. Where no existing infrastructure exists, it is now standard practice to deploy the latest-generation fibre-optic cables.

Asked to comment on why it was deploying copper to new estates instead of fibre, a Telstra spokesperson said the decision was due to policy laid down by the Government.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mc41 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Feb 2016 at 12:38pm
A former Coalition advisor who helped write the government's NBN policy has turned up at Telstra advising the telco about "longer term policy reform options".

Stephen Ellis worked in Malcolm Turnbull's office from 2009 until May 2015, when he was charged with committing an act of indecency in the presence of another man at Canberra Airport and for possessing LSD and amphetamines. Mr Ellis has pleaded not guilty to the charges and a hearing has been scheduled in the ACT Magistrates Court for May 2.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote mc41 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 May 2016 at 10:13am
Oh what a tangled web Turnbull has woven.   

No wonder Q abandoned ship
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cabosanlucas Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 May 2016 at 3:14pm
Fifield admits he knew of the AFP investigation as NBN co informed him of their request to the AFP. turnbull denies no prior knowledge at all.

really????

the AFP have become an arm of conservative govts since howards years.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cabosanlucas Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 May 2016 at 3:22pm
Fifield admits he knew of the AFP investigation as NBN co informed him of their request to the AFP. turnbull denies no prior knowledge at all.

really????

the AFP have become an arm of conservative govts since howards years.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mc41 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 May 2016 at 5:20pm
Its fanciful to believe the minister knew of the enquiry by the Feds yet didnt inform the PM.
Yet again citizens of this country getting treated like fools.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tlazolteotl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 May 2016 at 6:50pm
And this is what happens when you don't have leakers and whistle-blowers:





Outsourcing lets NBN keep its 'commercial-in-confidence' secrets

Our government sure is on the ball when it comes to outsourcing responsibility.

We still don’t have an answer to many basic questions about the National Broadband Network (and remember, it is your money being used to build it), as outsourcing allows NBN to hide all sorts of information, claiming “commercial in confidence”.

When NBN Co, as it was then known, was set up under the former Labor government in 2009, it was never intended that the company would build the entire broadband project itself. NBN never had the skilled workers and expertise to be able to build the project on its own.

Operating as a wholesale-only company means NBN needs to enter into commercial agreements with existing telecommunications providers like Optus, iiNet and Telstra in order to provide services to customers. And that means NBN has used the “commercial-in-confidence” excuse time and time again to avoid providing detail on a wide variety of information, both under the former Labor government and now as Malcolm Turnbull’s multi-technology mix rolls out.

Example One

How much taxpayer money is going to one of the biggest financial services companies on Wall Street? And what is the nature of the arrangement? Outsourcing allows NBN to keep that information secret.

In 2012 Fairfax journalist Lucy Battersby attempted to access documents under freedom of information in relation to the appointment of Goldman Sachs as a corporate adviser to NBN. NBN rejected the request, stating it would result in the company being forced to pay higher costs for services. When reviewed by the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner, then-commissioner James Popple found that that Goldman Sachs’ work for NBN Co, in providing corporate advice to the company, could be considered commercial advice:

“The corporate advisor was expected, amongst other things: to provide assurances that NBN Co will operate efficiently and at a minimal cost; to ensure quality of outputs; and, in the longer term, to maintain a commercially viable business platform that will allow NBN Co to pay commercial dividends and eventually privatise. I consider that the role of such a corporate advisor is commercial, and that documents in the last two categories listed above directly relate to NBN Co’s commercial activities.”

Popple, therefore, upheld NBN’s decision to reject the request. This decision, and an earlier one preventing the release of Telstra’s $11 billion agreement with NBN, has subsequently been cited by NBN in rejecting other, similar, requests for information under FOI that is “commercial-in-confidence”.

Example Two

Not even Parliament can overcome the mighty “commercial in confidence” excuse to find out information about the company it created and owns.

In the last Parliament, independent MP Rob Oakeshott chaired a joint parliamentary committee looking at the NBN. In one of the committee’s reports into the NBN examining the construction contracts in 2011, Oakeshott indicated that the use of the “commercial-in-confidence” claims during hearings could have impeded the committee’s ability to do its work.

The committee was seeking contract detail at the time because NBN had been struggling to negotiate its construction contract, and the committee was also seeking more insight into the Telstra and Optus agreements signed with NBN. Difficulties with the construction contracts were one of the reasons for the delays in the NBN under the former government. Then-CEO Mike Quigley would often respond to questions stating he could not disclose commercially confidential material.

Then-opposition communications spokesman Malcolm Turnbull, while often disagreeing with the committee’s majority view, agreed NBN could not always just rely on confidentiality claims to keep from giving evidence.

“While appreciating that some matters are genuinely commercially sensitive, the Coalition members of the committee do not see why a commercial contract should receive automatic and blanket protection from parliamentary scrutiny simply because it involves a private sector counter-party,” Turnbull said.

Example Three

How did NBN come up with its figures for the supposedly expensive Labor version of the NBN? We don’t get to know, because — you guessed it — it’s “commercial in confidence”.

For a long time NBN also used the “commercial-in-confidence” excuse to avoid providing a breakdown of the cost to roll out the network per premises. This could jeopardise its construction contract negotiations, the company said. But as soon as it became a controversial topic, NBN was finally able to produce a figure. Since the change of government, the true cost of the rollout is now a matter of contention. Turnbull’s reviews massively increased the estimated cost for Labor’s model — and claimed that the multi-technology mix the Coalition favoured was much cheaper.

Even now, NBN is still attempting to claim commercial confidentiality over information for the fibre-to-the-premises rollout NBN is no longer rolling out in full. As part of the company’s corporate plan, NBN developed a “high-level desktop analysis” of what it would cost to deploy a full fibre-to-the-premises network under current contracts instead of Turnbull’s multi-technology mix. In a committee hearing held on the day Turnbull challenged Abbott for the leadership, NBN chief financial officer Stephen Rue told the committee the analysis on a model of the project NBN was not going to commit to would still be commercial-in-confidence.

“[STEPHEN] CONROY: There are no new FttP contracts to be signed for brownfields. How are the details of something that is no longer happening commercial-in-confidence?

“RUE: We are still actually negotiating contracts for the multi-technology mix, which includes FttP. Things like pricing arrangements are obviously sensitive to our RSPs and our revenue going forward. So there are plenty of issues that are very commercially sensitive.”

Example Four

OK, so if we can’t find out how much of our money it will cost, can we at least learn when it will be ready? Nope again.

NBN has two documents it uses as a guide for when the NBN will be connected. The first is the publicly available three-year rollout plan released just before Turnbull became prime minister. It gives rough quarterly timelines for when a suburb can expect to be connected to the NBN. The second is a document detailing more specific “ready for service” dates that is given to NBN’s retail customers like iiNet, Optus, and Telstra. NBN’s commercial relationship with the retailers is used in this instance, to protect information NBN doesn’t want to be made public

Due to all the rollout delay problems example two caused the former company’s branding, the current administration of NBN does not want the latter document released at all, in case there are delays in the rollout in the future.

Former communications minister Stephen Conroy attempted to table the document in the last Senate estimates hearing, but NBN’s current CEO Bill Morrow sounded like his predecessor in again attempting to claim commercial confidentiality:

“This document is, under a widespread agreement by employees and RSPs [retail service providers], under confidentiality. The reason we have confidentiality agreements with employees and the RSPs around this is that, if let out, consumers will then begin to say, ‘I get my NBN service on this particular date.’ With these moves and changes — that could be everything from the RSP delaying that service offering to us moving that date because we are moving a lot of different elements — that consumer will be frustrated with nbn. That frustration could lead to a lower take-up rate that could impact the internal rate of return on the investment by the taxpayer.

“Therefore, there is a commercial implication behind revealing this information, otherwise we would have shared it openly and publicly, as we have with the construction start time frame. So that is our primary concern.”

In this respect, NBN is attempting to argue that brand protection is a reason to claim commercial confidentiality.

**

A spokesperson for NBN told Crikey that the government expected NBN to behave like a commercial entity.

“It’s important to note, we are subject to all standard GBE [government business enterprise] and relevant corporate and commercial legislative and regulatory regimes. The industry, our customers and the Commonwealth expect NBN to operate like a normal commercial business,” the spokesperson said.

Turnbull vowed when he came into power to make NBN more transparent, and he has, with quarterly results updates and weekly rollout updates, but there remains a heavy reliance of “commercial-in-confidence” to avoid providing information the company cannot control with brand overhauls and marketing campaigns.

http://www.crikey.com.au/2015/11/20/outsourcing-lets-nbn-keep-its-commercial-in-confidence-secrets/


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dr E Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 May 2016 at 10:37pm
What does it matter "who knew" so long as the AFP catch prosecute and expose the criminals responsible ... that is their job Bill.

The way that Bill has responded shows that he is no more than Julia and Kevin's love child ... obvious by the combination of his deceitful eloquence and her boobs.

It's like deja vu ... attack everyone else with unsubstantiated and unimportant conspiracy theories, whilst defending the criminals within your ranks, because they are after all, the fibre that holds the ALP together.Dead
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Passing Through Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 May 2016 at 12:27pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Passing Through Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 May 2016 at 5:41pm

Thin-skinned NBN succeeds in throwing spotlight on Turnbull decisions

For a company that accepts criticism with all the grace of a steel hammer hit right between the eyes, the NBN has found itself, and by extension Malcolm Turnbull, in the spotlight thanks to its own decisions.

Chris Duckett

By  |  | Topic: NBN

The National Broadband Network (NBN) company found itself in a rare position over the weekend: Front and centre of an election campaign, with conspiracy theories, claims, and counterclaims running every which way.

Labor is in the midst of a drive to determine who knew what and when, with Communications Minister Mitch Fifield confessing on Saturday that while he was aware of the investigation of leaked confidential NBN documents by the Australian Federal Police (AFP), he did not tell other ministers or his prime minister.

In this whole saga, it is best to remember Hanlon's razor: Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity.

That goes for the initial referral by NBN senior management, the AFP conducting a raid in the middle of a federal election campaign, NBN's security investigations manager taking photographs of documents and passing them on to fellow NBN workers, and the government's attempts to hose down the issue.

Clive Palmer claimed over the weekend that Communications Minister cum Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull had previously asked him to use his Palmer United Party votes in the Senate to remove former Communications Minister Stephen Conroy from the Senate Select Committee examining the NBN.

"Turnbull offered to appoint me chairman of a Parliamentary Joint Committee for NBN. Turnbull was worried about the senate committee questioning the chief executive of the NBN," Palmer said.

"I think he was worried the Truth [sic] would come out about NBN, he wanted me [to] shut it down. He said he wanted to get Conroy. I refused. I have seen the Liberals direct police before. Wink Wink. Nudge Nudge. Say no more promotion on the way."

On Sunday morning, in response to Palmer's accusations, Finance Minister and NBN shareholder minister Mathias Cormann claimed on ABC Insiders that there is no political sensitivity around the broadband rollout, and that it is much more transparent than before.

"They are reporting on a weekly basis on the progress that they're making, and of course, you know, we inherited a project in very bad shape from Labor and we are now making it a reality and we're doing it according to our plans," Cormann said.

"Those plans are out in the public domain, and NBN reports regularly and openly and transparently on their performance."

The targets that Cormann claims NBN is hitting are significantly reduced from those when Turnbull gained responsibility for the NBN after the 2013 election.

When you look at the state of the NBN in 2016, it is far removed from the universal minimum of 25Mbps to all premises by the end of the first term of the Coalition government.

The extent to which the project has fallen behind what the electorate was sold three years ago is thus of public interest.

NBN is not a private enterprise; it is a government-owned de facto monopoly business. The country and its citizens own its equity, not the market.

For anyone to claim that the public should not know that the rollout is slower than expected with rising costs, that the company is looking at cheaper technologies to bring costs down, and that over three dozen fibre-to-the-node areas are behind schedule is to take the public for mugs.

It is disingenuous to claim, as Cormann has, that NBN throwing a bunch of numbers over the wall each week is transparency. The weekly rollout figures are headline numbers at best -- they do not detail which fibre technology is being used, and they bundle fibre-to-the-premises, fibre-to-the-node, and fibre-to-the-basement into one number, with geographical breakdown limited to states and territories.

For the past three years, NBN has covered as much information as it can in its now-infamous "commercial-in-confidence" phrase. It has built a castle of secrecy around the rollout, and expects to gain plaudits for a PDF spreadsheet export and notification of when particular suburbs are switched on.

We are not talking about industrial espionage theft; this is a case of a whistleblower making information public through a senator in a country with an appalling lack of protection for such acts.

It goes to the heart of the decision making by the current prime minister, who is trying to convince the electorate that he is the best person to steer the good ship Australia.

"This is about the ongoing theft of intellectual property from a business in which the Australian taxpayers have billions of dollars invested, which was causing harm to that business," Cormann said.

While the level of harm to a government-backed entity -- which will continue its rollout regardless -- caused by knowledge of delays and confirmation of information long suspected is questionable, it does have the potential to be much more damaging for Turnbull.

If ever there was a case of pointing out that the emperor has no clothes, it is with Turnbull's handling of the NBN.

After one term of Coalition stewardship, the takeaway lesson is that it takes time to change course with a large infrastructure project like the NBN, and the reality does not measure up to the promise made in opposition.

The changes and maths used by Turnbull in 2013 were all based on opportunity costs, and being able to switch the technologies used in a 12-month window. Each and every day, those calculations appear to be increasingly wrong, yet here we are with Turnbull trying to convince the electorate that we can switch our economy to one based on innovations, agility, and startup culture.

With a switch on the nation's largest infrastructure project going awry, the question should be raised as to why Australia should trust Turnbull to have a second go at a switch-up with the nation itself.

The Coalition was doing a good job of keeping these issues out of the public spotlight, but thanks to NBN deciding to go directly for the nuclear option in December last year and call in the feds, it is now squarely back on the agenda.

To have an election that focuses on the decision making and risk taking of the prime minister rather than the gaffe of the day is a welcome one.

And in the words of the company responsible for the rollout of the National Broadband Network across Australia: Bring it on.

http://www.zdnet.com/article/thin-skinned-nbn-succeeds-in-throwing-spotlight-on-turnbull-decisions/

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mc41 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Jun 2016 at 4:38pm
Mr Turdbull   why can't I watch TV because its raining  Evil Smile
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote djebel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Jun 2016 at 4:42pm
Retweet

Originally posted by mc41 mc41 wrote:

Mr Turdbull   why can't I watch TV because its raining  Evil Smile




STRIKE WHILST THE IRON IS HOT

reductio ad absurdum

The richest man is not he who has the most, but he who needs the least.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SkyDancer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Jun 2016 at 4:53pm
Originally posted by djebel djebel wrote:

Retweet

Originally posted by mc41 mc41 wrote:

Mr Turdbull   why can't I watch TV because its raining  Evil Smile



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote acacia alba Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Jun 2016 at 2:56am
Its flogging down here and I can still watch TV  ???

animals before people.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mc41 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Jun 2016 at 11:31am
Most of us in suburbia on the Goldcoast only have satellite  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tlazolteotl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Jun 2016 at 12:26pm
Originally posted by mc41 mc41 wrote:

Most of us in suburbia on the Goldcoast only have satellite  

That's your choice isn't it? You're not in a remote area where satellite is the only option.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Passing Through Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Jun 2016 at 12:36pm
I am only a half hour from the Gold Coast and we kept losing signal on FTA digital channels. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dr E Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Jun 2016 at 7:18pm
Read a book.
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