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Mick Kent Interview

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Gay3 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Gay3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Mick Kent Interview
    Posted: 18 Nov 2014 at 2:29pm
Covers bleeding, hard tracks, soundness, rearing & too much to remember. An extremely informative 12mins or so well worth the listen & saving Thumbs Up

https://soundcloud.com/rsn-racing/mick-kent-trainer-racing
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote PhillipC Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Nov 2014 at 7:16pm
Some really good insights

Here's a direct link for anyone interested https://soundcloud.com/rsn-racing/mick-kent-trainer-racing
http://www.equinehaven.com.au
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote neouniverse1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Nov 2014 at 8:37pm
File not found... Can u reupload, thanks.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Oritah Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Nov 2014 at 9:33pm
Thanks Gay, that was an insightful interview! 

Raised lots of very good points, interesting comments around bent legs... Bit like the caslick operation, it got those mares which are poorly conformed behind breeding but also it has perpetuated the problem... I have a repo vet clinic price list that included swabs and caslicks for TB mares built into the standard pricing - I find this concerning... 

So I ask the question why bother with x-ray if you are going to allow non disclosure of stripped legs at sales? Seems to go against the principal? 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gay3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Nov 2014 at 6:29am
I think many will agree with his thoughts on the rigid German stallion selection standard, whereby only sound horses can qualify, it makes perfect sense to me.
Also the correlation between lung bleeds & firm surfaces altho' finding any papers to support this is difficult....whoops, impossible so far. I wonder where the US study done in Macau could be found, perhaps it's ongoing Confused
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Browndog Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Nov 2014 at 6:42am
There is a mention of hard tracks and EIPH on pg 64-65 on this US paper:

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bradjm Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Nov 2014 at 7:00am
Its interesting, are the horses more fragile because of breeding or is it more to do with rearing ?

Cotton wooled on paddocks that have no surface deviations and are relatively soft under foot

Overfed under exercised

I'd tend to lean towards rearing as the main culprit

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gay3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Nov 2014 at 7:14am
Have you listened to it bradjm? He specifically targets rearing, citing their value & being mollycoddled in small paddocks to prevent injury instead of large acreage with plenty of mates. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bradjm Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Nov 2014 at 9:23am
Originally posted by Gay3 Gay3 wrote:

Have you listened to it bradjm? He specifically targets rearing, citing their value & being mollycoddled in small paddocks to prevent injury instead of large acreage with plenty of mates. 



Yes I did but he also talks about the breeding.

I was just saying I'd probably lean more towards the rearing as being a dominant factor thats resulted in less durable horses
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Oritah Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Nov 2014 at 8:51pm
He talked about both. 

He talked about breeding on problems - roarers, bleeders, straightened legs etc and problems which are being perpetuated.... 

He also talked about rearing. 

Racehorses need strong bones to cope with the incredible forces placed on those legs at the gallop... To lay down bone you need concussion, the body responds to the concussion by making the bones denser. Think about the bone density of those astronauts in space -  they can hardly walk off the shuttles because of lack of use..... Lock them up and you deny them bone density.

When you look at constitutional soundness, the horse is at the lower end of the scale, then we compound this with poor rearing practices, coupled with a plethora of avoidable problems due to indiscriminate breeding and we then have really big problems heading our way..... 
 
  
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Lord Hybrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Sep 2019 at 10:24pm
A terrific interview with Mick Kent on the RSN Racing Pulse podcast today.

Refreshing to hear intelligent commentary about several racing issues from a trainer.

Well worth a listen.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Gay3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Sep 2019 at 4:39pm

There’s a saying that you should never trust men in bowties or people who wear dark glasses on cloudy days.

Mick Kent is a bit of a hermit who rarely draws attention to himself, so there’s little risk of him popping up anywhere in a bowtie.

But Kent does wear dark glasses on gloomy days. (He says the sun burns his eyes, others reckon he likes to hide, or is arrogant).

Fortunately, Kent CAN be trusted, not just as a successful and imaginative trainer but as one of racing’s most astute “thinkers.”

Kent never does pre-race interviews, declaring them a mozz, and rarely sits still for long enough to be contained to a radio studio for an hour.

But the Cranbourne trainer was lassoed into the RSN studio for Open Mike this morning where he spoke expansively on a range of subjects.

Here are some snippets.

On the announcement this morning that David Hayes would return to Hong Kong to train, Kent, who spent a decade training in South-East Asia himself, said it was “probably a marriage made in heaven.”

“He has a good team of horses down here he can pull from and a lot of clients want to buy yearlings and make a profit selling them to Hong Kong. I think it’s a really smart idea.”

Of his seven years in Singapore (and later two in Macau), Kent said “I got there very green.”

“I just wanted everything to win. It just doesn’t work that way up there. You become a betting advisor.”

“When you say the horse can win, they (owners) want it to win obviously. You had to be pretty right.”

Kent said the art of setting up a horse for a punt up there meant that quite often “some of your lowest class horses are your best horses.”

Kent first stumbled across the “science” of training while in Singapore, via an expert in lactic recovery. The first guinea pig was a horse imported to Singapore from Aidan O’Brien.

Ridden in traditional style, the horse proved disappointing, even though its lactic recovery figures on the treadmill had been through the roof.

“I was lying in bed and had one of those Eureka moments. I sacked (Mick) Dittman, put Shane Scriven on, on the dirt, nine furlongs. I told him when you get past the first corner, as soon as the pace slackens, off you go. He won by eight. Next start at 2000m he won by about 10.

“I thought “geez, I don’t know anything about training horses.”

Kent later found a cardiologist who rated the heart scores of horses, a key to performance. “You’re not going to be elite unless you’ve got a V8 engine,” he said.

Of buying horses locally, Kent said “it still frightens me, the cost of a horse, for how many are any good. It’s a bad equation.”

Kent spoke of “speed genes” and a failed attempt to breed and prepare locally bred stock to win the Melbourne Cup.  Dubbed the “ANZAC Fightback”, the concept attracted enthusiasm but not investors.

Of breeding, owning and training local stayers, Kent said: “I think people have given up a bit.”

“I’m sure we have the blood, it’s just the approach (that’s lacking),” he said.

Kent continued his passionate push to save Sandown, saying he wondered if it was truly in the Melbourne Racing Club’s charter to sell it.

“I wonder about the legacy,” he said.

He spoke of the biggest bet he’d ever had – a Flemington winner at 25-1 – and also ventured into the delicate topic of female riders and the greater risks they face, at least statistically.

By Matt Stewart




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