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VEEEIGHT View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote VEEEIGHT Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Sep 2010 at 7:21pm
fats are beneficial to horses in work.
Ask Dr John Kohnke ,Dr Peter Huntington, Dr Joe Pagan, Dr nereida Richards and Dr Caroline Foote.
The benifits of feeding fats to horses in work are as follows : Fats provide 2.5 times more energy on digestion than carbohydrates or protein, the rduce the bulk and volume of feed a horse has to consume to meet its daily energy requirements, reduced gut fill and hindgut weight, decreased hindgut heat, and incresed supply of metabolic water and "Studies have shown that heart rates were slower to increase during medium intentsity excersise and galloping horses were able to work harder and longer when 10%fat was substituted for grain energy.
A diet containing 12% energy as fat increased resting blood glucose content by 26%. Over a 2-3 month period a similar intake of fat increased muscle glycogen by 16%"
How is this not beneficial to the racehorse?
Magnesium is also lost daily through the horses sweat.!
The magority of Pre mixed feeds for horses in work are based on minimum 10% fat eg MITAVITE FORMULA 3 XLR8 HYGAIN RELEASE, TRACKTORQE.
There are also feeds available for growing horses which contain minimum amounts of fat MITAVITE PROMITA MITAVITE YEARLING PREP HYGAIN GROWTRQUE KER LOW GI AND SOME OF THE PRYDES AND PEGASUS FEEDS.
 
There is research data available to show that adding fat to the ration of growing horses does have the benefits that I mentioned in my earlier post.and by adding fat as an energy source instead of grain you are lowering the GLYCEMIC INDEX.
 
It is common knowledge that oats and high fibre hays such grass/ oaten hays produce the most waste heat during digestion and is why nutritionists usually recommend these feeds for horses kept at pasture during cold conditons so as to keep the horse warm.
 
Oats and hays have also shown to be disadvantageous when fed to racehorses woking under hot hmid conditions ie tropiclal climents due to the excess heat load the horse has to dissipate by sweating and blowing after hard of fast work.
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote VEEEIGHT Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Sep 2010 at 7:24pm

excuse spelling errors clicked post instead of preview.Confused

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote VEEEIGHT Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Sep 2010 at 9:48pm
Originally posted by Gay3 Gay3 wrote:

Originally posted by VEEEIGHT VEEEIGHT wrote:

 Adding  fat/oil as an energy source to the ration of growing horses  lowers the GI of the feed provided thereby helping prevent the insulan spike and risk of developmental disease in young horses so often attributed by high grain diets.

Fats/oils are digested in the small intestine and do not overload into the hindgut therefore do not create  heat from digestion.
 
Feeding fat/oil as part of the ration to horses in work also provides numerous advantages.
 
Fiberous feeds such as oats, chaff and hay as well as excess protein will ferment  in the hindgut to produce heat.

  WHERE DID I MENTION HIGH FAT DIETS?


Tho' this all sounded wrong to me, I was at a loss for an educated explanation so enlisted help from a friend whose reply is below:


"Horses evolved on high fermentable fibre diets and to be eating fairly constantly when awake.  The upper portion of the stomach does not secrete acid and is populated by bacteria of the Lactobacillus/Streptococcus family which begin the job of fermenting sugars, starches and plant fructans into volatile fatty acids (VFAs), including lactate and acetate which can be burned directly in the mitochondria (energy factory in a cell/Krebs cycle) with little processing.  Lactate can also be efficiently converted to glucose or stored as glycogen by the liver.

The natural equine diet is very low in fats, only about 4 to 6% and often lower on a dry matter basis.  Grass has a high content of the essential anti inflammatory omega-3 and pro inflammatory omega-6 fatty acids, with a ratio of 4:1 or higher.  (More on this is discussed on my page called ‘Linseed, is it safe?’  http://www.balancedequine.com.au/nutrition/linseed.html)

The efficiency of fat digestion in horses is amazingly high, about 80 to 90%+.  Since the level of fat is so low in vegetation perhaps that’s why horses need to be so efficient with absorbing fat for the essential omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids.  Essential means they have to come from the diet and cannot be manufactured by the digestive system.

"Adding fat/oil as an energy source to the ration of growing horses lowers the GI of the feed provided thereby helping prevent the insulan spike and risk of developmental disease in young horses so often attributed by high grain diets."
If you want to reduce insulin spikes feed a diet containing low sugar and starch ingredients, the general guide is 10% or less.  A wealth of information on managing insulin resistance is at http://www.ecirhorse.com  Feeds like low sugar and starch grass hay, beet pulp, soybean hulls are appropriate.  High starch feeds like grains are not, nor is feeding a high fat diet beneficial.

"Fats/oils are digested in the small intestine and do not overload into the hindgut therefore do not create heat from digestion."
As far as I know there is no study that demonstrates fat feeding can produce a lower heat load that translates into improved performance.

"Fiberous feeds such as oats, chaff and hay as well as excess protein will ferment in the hindgut to produce heat."
Avoiding overfeeding of grain will help, ditto excessive amounts of protein.  The micro organisms of the hindgut evolved in the gut to ferment fibre into fuel for energy.

"Feeding fat/oil as part of the ration to horses in work also provides numerous advantages."
I can't think of one other than replacing anti inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids lost when grass is cured into hay and only a very small amount of linseeds or linseed oil is required.

There's no reason to feed fat other than to gain weight on a horse (and there are healthier ways to put weight on a horse).  Fat will build fat but that is only extra weight for an athletic horse to carry. The body will make all the fat it needs from glucose, VFAs or the carbon skeletons of amino acids. If you feed fat, it either has to be burned or stored as fat. Fat is the least versatile nutrient out there.

Other negatives with high fat feeding (explained in a lot more detail by Dr Eleanor Kellon VMD in her equine nutrition courses http://drkellon.com)

High intakes of vegetable oil can suppress magnesium absorption by forming insoluble salts.  If the oil is totally digested, it's not a problem.  If it escapes to the large bowel, it will carry bound magnesium with it.

Fat is directly contraindicated for growing horses: http://jas.fass.org/cgi/content/abstract/77/12/3330

Fat is very efficiently converted to stored fat, with fewer calories expended to process it into fat stores.  On another level, high fat diets mimic the triglyceride release that occurs with starvation, causing the cells to interpret this as an energy crisis, muscle burning less glycogen, becoming insulin resistant. High fat feeding is recognised as a risk factor for insulin resistance, in horses is comparable to type 2 diabetes in people.

Storing fat is very energy efficient but burning fat for energy is not.  The preference by the body is to store fat.

In this human study, a 43% increase in fat intake had striking effects on mitochondrial function: http://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/cgi/reprint/54/7/1926  Long term high fat also reduces mitochondrial number.  The authors concluded that the metabolic changes seen with high fat feeding are identical to those induced by fasting or starvation.  The release of fatty acids from body fat depots occurs when blood glucose levels drop, as during fasting or starvation. This sends a red flag message to curb the burning of glucose and preserve stored glycogen.


Regards
Carol Layton
Independent Equine Nutritionist
http://www.balancedequine.com.au

For feeding advice and optimised, mineral balanced diets
Easycare and Renegade boot sales

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jayzaa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Sep 2010 at 7:40am
HEY, SLOWDOWN,     HAPPY BIRTHDAY  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote slowdown Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Sep 2010 at 8:42am
HEY JAYZAA, TA ! LOL
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote melnclo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Nov 2014 at 9:31am
Hi slowdown just courious on what feed changes you made and now years later what you were most pleased with... ??
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote slowdown Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Nov 2014 at 10:11am
hi Melnclo, well where do i start ?

for our mares,foals, yearlings and 2/3 year olds we feed a mineral balanced diet based around maxisoy and lucerne/oaten chaff . going back in this thread you will find that Gay referred the oil based diet to Carol Layton. strangely enough my wifes horse has issues with laminitis and ended up getting help from Carol. this began a process where we decided to get her help with all of our up and comers as well as her horse. i guess we have been doing this for around 3 years now and i feel the latest yearlings are looking the best we have had.(you can find pictures of them in the breeding thread under 2013 foals). we had to get grass samples from the paddock they were in plus hay they were fed. Carol then built a diet around the results of the test. having red soil we are extremely high in iron which in turn ties up some of the other minerals from the ground so we  have substitute this in their feed. the diet advice cost i think $200 for the first horse and $100 after that. i feel it has been well worth it . Also Carol doesnt just drop you after giving you the diet. she continues to offer advice and support should you have any questions. we have only ever paid the initial money for a yearling, my wifes horse and mare/with foal.we just continue with the same diets each year. we find the foals are happy go get stuck in to the mothers feed early and as a result they get the benefits of the diet. My wife is now studying the course and is loving it. she is a scientist so this helps ! pre racing i change them to an oaten diet as we have found once arriving at the trainers they can take a while to start eating the new diet which is mainly oats. on returning we still give them the oaten diet between preps along with some maxisoy and the minerals and once again work them up to the oats before heading back to the trainers. hope that answers the question.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote melnclo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Nov 2014 at 12:54pm
We have been feeding easi breed with extra soy, lupin, barley and chaff. And grow our own lucerne,oaten and barley hay. They are turned out on 40 acres of varying terrain from sandy loam creek flats, gentle to steep hill sides.. We tried them on mare cubes but they wouldn't have a bar of it... Have just found a local farmer who mixes a variety of horse feeds... Tried them on his mare/foal mix and they can't get enough of it!! Despite my desire to provide a natural environment and feed I dare say he is no scientist so may be worthwhile having similar tests done to ensure we are not lacking anything essential ..
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote slowdown Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Nov 2014 at 1:04pm
sure thing Mel, sounds like youre really having a crack at doing it right. Should you wish Carol has a website that you can have a look at. the website is named Balance Equine Nutrition. Gay will vouch for Carol and her work too. sounds like great country with the variations in creek flats and slope. we run our weaned ones on around 8 acres of triangular hill and then we swap them to a 10 acre flat paddock. they are just outside our lounge room windows so we can sit there in the evening and watch them bolt around....
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote melnclo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Nov 2014 at 2:10pm
Wonderful !! Thank you for your insight :) there's nothing quite like the thundering sound of them tearing up the hill side..
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote slowdown Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Nov 2014 at 2:31pm
no probs Smile
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote slowdown Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 Nov 2014 at 9:13am
hey Mel, apologies. i though Carol was in Vic. she is in NSW. We have just started our mare and foal on a new batch of mineral mix. hopefully as good a result as the last pair...
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