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Laminitis Animation - Sinker Etc.

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Gay3 View Drop Down
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    Posted: 14 May 2007 at 4:23am
http://www.wildabouthooves.com.au/rehabcases.htm

Just practising this hyperlink thingy & I've now got it beat thanks to Wortel but had to find something to practice with & think this is reasonably interesting/applicable.
The lead story is on West Quest but if interested, check out 'Mollys' story as it shows how correct action can save even an horrendous case like this.
Runfer, there's a deformed hoof 1/2way down the page which might be relevant to the Ultralight case.


Edited by Gay3 - 16 May 2015 at 9:04am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (3) Thanks(3)   Quote Gay3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Jan 2014 at 1:04pm

The site appears to have removed both pics but this shows the detail:

http://thelaminitissite.org/feet.html


Yes, another thread but this is too pertinent to be lost amongst the 1000s of posts in about 8 different threads Smile

Rotation vs. Sinking

In cases of “Founder” or “Chronic Laminitis” you will hear the terms describing the condition as rotation or sinking.  These are basically descriptions of how the coffin bone is responding to the hoof wall.

 

Rotation

Rotation is the most common type of hoof wall movement and in most cases is easier to manage, as the proximal aspect of the coffin bone and the hoof wall maintain their relationship, and only the distal borders are being leveraged apart.  The term “Rotation” has commonly been used when the dorsal surface of the coffin bone stretches or separates its distal (bottom) attachment from the hoof capsule and appears to rotate downward. (Figure 1)  As a rule, the coffin bone maintains its general position relative to the ground.  The displacement of the hoof capsule is dorsal and proximal (forward and upward).  The tipping of the bone that is seen later is generally a result of extra heel growth.  


Example of the "Rotation" Process (Figure 1)   Original pic removed Angry

Image result for laminitis rotation pic

 

Separation or rotation measurements can be very slight (2° to 5°) or quite severe (15° to 18° or more). Some veterinarians will base the prognosis or their decision to euthanize upon the amount of rotation. The most common technique for measuring rotation is to measure the angle between the dorsal (front) surface of the coffin bone and the dorsal (front) surface of the hoof capsule.  Although this method is useful and widely accepted, common non-laminitic hoof capsule distortion is not always considered.  For example, a horse could be diagnosed with 5° of rotation but not actually have rotation or laminitis.  We commonly see horses with hoof capsule distortion where the laminae and wall have become stretched causing a non-parallel relationship between the dorsal surfaces of the coffin bone and hoof capsule, however no clinical signs of laminitis are seen.  Club feet that have been poorly managed are a good example of this.

Another common radiographic evaluation used for laminitis is to measure the distance between the dorsal surface of the hoof capsule and the dorsal surface of the coffin bone.  You may hear this referred to as “horn-lamellar zone width (H-L Zone)”, “hoof distal phalangeal distance (HDPD)”, or “separation”.  Normally a 1000 lb. horse might have an H-L Zone of 15mm – 17mm.  The greater the amount of separation often corresponds to a poorer prognosis by many veterinarians.  Although the degrees of rotation are still more widely discussed, the amount of separation seems to offer a better correlation between the severity of the laminitis and the resulting prognosis.  

Keep in mind that it is critical that you understand the horse’s condition by gathering as much information as possible before determining the horse’s fate.   The decision should always be based upon more than just the measurement of rotation and separation.  The speed at which first aide is applied to the foot, how quickly the coffin bone becomes stable, how much circulation is compromised, and the amount of coffin bone loss are all factors that need to be considered.  The sooner the condition can be safely addressed the better chances the horse will have of returning to soundness.

 

Sinking

Laminitis cases that are termed “sinkers” tend to be the most complicated cases.  This condition occurs when the coffin bone loses most of it attachment to the hoof capsule and moves distally (downward) in the hoof capsule (or the hoof capsule moves proximal to the coffin bone).   (Figure 2)  The amount of hoof capsule separation from the bone (H-L Zone) is also used as part of the diagnostic evaluation.  Another evaluation that seems to be more appropriate for sinkers is to measure the amount of distal displacement of the bone within the hoof capsule.  With radiograph markers that are properly placed so that the hairline is clearly identified, a measurement is taken vertically from the hairline to the proximal end of the extensor process of the coffin bone.  Many domestic horses seem to have some distal displacement that is considered normal (up to 10mm or ½”).  However, if the amount of distal displacement is 18mm (3/4”) or greater then the chances for a full recovery are less likely.


Example of the "Sinking" Process (Figure 2)   Original pic removed Angry

3_laminitis_sinker.jpg



Edited by Gay3 - 23 Nov 2016 at 9:47am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Dr E Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Jan 2014 at 1:13pm
Looks bloody painful! Unhappy
In reference to every post in the Trump thread ... "There may have been a tiny bit of license taken there" ... Ok, Thanks for the "heads up" PT!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tontonan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Jan 2014 at 2:40pm
Excellent article and graphic.

May have been better filed under Laminitis though.  It's the sort of thing folks are likely to search for in future. 

(Who am I kidding ?  It's the sort of thing I am likely to search for in future).

Articles like this deserve their own space I reckon - a reference section on horse anatomy, etc..  I've collected a few graphics myself over the years (filed away somewhere) that I'd post.  If they add to the layperson's understanding of horses they have got to be a good thing.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Gay3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Jan 2014 at 3:05pm
I'll do both (gee we badly need a Health forum Unhappy) because whilst I agree, I figured some of the punters & conspiracy theorists may like an insight into the condition Wink
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Tontonan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Jan 2014 at 4:22pm
I didn't realize there was already a conformation forum Embarrassed



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Pazman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Jan 2014 at 4:25pm
Someone spray painted the pictures. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote acacia alba Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Jan 2014 at 10:11pm
ahhh suck eggs Pazz.
thats how horses suffer with laminitis. 
face up.  be real for once .
else wises, what are you doing on a racing forum, apart from stirring ??
animals before people.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Shammy Davis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Jan 2014 at 1:20am
Thanks Gay3.  I agree TBV needs a health forum.  Though I like your animation better, here's another one that is apparently under construction and shows an animated resection.

http://home.olympus.net/~pvd/Movie.html


http://home.olympus.net/~pvd/MovieII.html

AA:  So you all suck eggs too?  LOLLOL
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gay3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 May 2015 at 9:01am

Researchers seek cure for deadly laminitis hoof disease in horses

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http://abc.net.au/news/2015-05-14/researchers-hope-to-find-cure-to-laminitis-disease-in-horses/6471000

A team of ponies has been helping Australian researchers search for the cause and cure for the costly, common and incurable equine disease, laminitis.

The disease is the second-biggest killer of horses, a painful and potentially deadly hoof condition that affects thousands of horses a year.

At the moment it's untreatable - many horses have to be put down if they get the disease and it gets to the severe stage, so it's devastating.

Professor Martin Sillence

The groundbreaking research triggered a joint multi-million-dollar project by the Queensland University of Technology (QUT), the University of Queensland, Melbourne University and Charles Sturt University in New South Wales.

The science has returned positive results and researchers said a preventative treatment could be within reach.

The next part of the project is to find the ponies good homes.

QUT science director Professor Martin Sillence said the disease could be cruel.

"At the moment it's untreatable - many horses have to be put down if they get the disease and it gets to the severe stage, so it's devastating," he said.

Until five years ago, the cause of the disease was hotly debated.

Professor Sillence has headed the team that has proved that in most cases, high insulin levels are to blame.

He said in horses prone to laminitis, or founder as it is more commonly known, sweet feed was shown to trigger toxic levels of the hormone.

"The most common form of laminitis that affects ponies and horses that are on rich pasture, is certainly down to excess levels of insulin in the blood - it's like human diabetes," he said.

Professor Sillence said genetic predisposition, over-feeding and a lack of exercise also played a part.

"The difference is the horses' pancreas never fails and pumps out massive amounts of insulin until it causes this devastating result, which is when the hooves start to come apart from the legs," he said.

Horse owner Errol Maudsley said he always suspected his daughter's pony, Coco, might have been prone to founder because of his round stature.

He said they had always managed him accordingly.

"We lock him up and restrict how much he eats, but after all the rain he caught us out and he actually foundered - it's just access to so much feed," he said.

In Coco's case, it was caught early and treated, but Mr Maudsley said management would be ongoing.

"Forever - now that we know he's prone - we'll have to watch him all the time," he said.

100 ponies used in research project

Professor Sillence said researchers had been looking at different strategies to combat the condition.

"To get insulin levels down in horses, to identify horses at risk of getting the disease, to develop diagnostic tests, and also to develop novel ways to treat it," he said.

The researchers recruited 100 ponies, because there was no certain way to predict which ones were prone to the disease when the project started.

The study also showed it was not possible to predict the potential to founder by the horse's body type.

The two-year trials returned positive results in a range of areas, including methods of predicting disease risk and a reliable diagnostic test.

Professor Sillence said some of the results were surprising.

"In the past we've diagnosed based on giving intravenous injections of glucose or insulin - that's what they do in humans as well - to see if they're diabetic," he said.

"But we found in ponies, because the problem starts in the intestinal system, you can give it the usual human diagnostic test and the pony will come up negative.

"But when you give it sugar or a sweet feed, their insulin levels go through the roof, so it's a new way of testing to be sure if the pony is at risk or not at risk."

Professor Sillence said the ponies found to be prone to laminitis were then part of a clinical trial using human diabetes medication.

"The drug company work looks really promising - it looks like we might be close to a preventative treatment," he said.

QUT veterinarian Dr Alexandra Meiers said that work was vital.

"This has the potential to revolutionise laminitis in ponies," she said.

Mr Maudsley agreed.

"It would be fantastic - you wouldn't have to worry as much, particularly if you went away and someone was looking after your animals and they're not experienced enough - it could be a disaster," he said.

New homes needed for ponies

The ponies' work is now done and 40 of them will get new homes over the next four months.

The animals had been under the best of vet care while they had been in the program and now the researchers are looking for some special owners.

Dr Meiers said a lot of the ponies were "perfectly healthy and have no problems at all".

"Then on the other side, we have ponies who have metabolic syndrome and are prone to laminitis, and in that case we need really caring, diligent owners," she said.

There is a nominal adoption fee and the researchers can be contacted via their Facebook page: University Pony Adoptions.

Experience is something you gain a few minutes after you could have used it!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gay3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 May 2015 at 10:28am
Some interesting comments from a hoofcare group:

  • Carola Adolf Had a bit of a rant when this was posted elsewhere and people were wondering why I got upset..... well - honestly - if these "researchers" would be researching the internet a bit, they would find that they have been sitting in a closet for about two decades. This article and report left me gobsmacked.

  • Suzy Wong Isn't a new drug the outcome of this study to prevent susceptible ponies/horses? Not that I'm a fan of drugs, but sometimes necessary.

  • Anya Lav The line under the pic got me - he suspected his daughter's pony was at risk of the disease.... why?? Anything to do with it looking like a BALLOON?? tongue emoticon Now I'll go read it...

  • Carola Adolf Once they come up with a drug to cure misconceptions in management and hoofcare, I'll support it!

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote acacia alba Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 May 2015 at 11:26am
while having a free read of Kanga,s article, in Racetrack, in the local newsagents, I noticed another story in there about laminitis.  Didnt get to read it properly but it was about a zebra they have , at that place in US, Bolt Equine Hospital, is it ? he is being used to look for cures for laminitis.  i might go back and have another free read so i get the info correct.
animals before people.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gay3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 Nov 2016 at 8:38am

Laminitis! What do I do?

The mere thought of Laminitis for any of our equine friends is just terrifying!  It sends the hair rising on the backs of our necks and the pits of our stomachs to recoil. I've heard some people say their vets or farriers tell them its 'the end' for the horse.  

But, IA quick checklist: 

'm here to tell you ... that's NOT TRUE!

For almost 20 years I worked with pathological hooves ... laminitis, founder, sinking founder, perforated founders ... and while some horses were not able to go back to their original 'work', a solid 95% of them were!  

Here is just one extreme example. Now, granted, this pony wasn't in heavy-duty work ... but she was giving pony parties and doing little kid lessons. She foundered, and PERFORATED all 4 hooves. In 6 months she was back to giving little kids rides and happy as a clam. (remember, this horse wasn't just 'laminitic' .. she was full-blown, perforated foundered!) The owner and hoofcare person didn't recognize what was happening to begin with so the initial laminitis progressed into the founder stage. 

This is a simple graphic showing the progression of recuperation:

 

And here is her first xray: 

Her front right hoof progression: 

As you can see -- she was about the worst one can imagine. BUT ... again, she went back to her former state of 'work' and is still goin' at it today ... 5 years later and goin' at it strong! So a horse in a state of Acute Laminitis stands a way better chance of ful recovery than the girl above. !! 

So, if you've got a horse that is suspected laminitic or has been seen by a farrier or veterinarian and is diagnosed as 'laminitic' ... don't despair ... take a deep breath and don't let anyone tell you "it's the end" for your horse. Do NOT believe it! 

The first thing to do is to MAKE SURE the hooves are trimmed CORRECTLY for that horse ... that may be a difficult exercise to complete. If you're suspecting your horse is developing laminitis look for a person who has a solid track record for recovery of laminitic and foundered horses and is a BAREFOOT specialist!  Someone who understands the anatomy and physiology of the equine digit. Ask to get references. If you can actually SEE, for yourself, recovered horses then go see them!  Don't just accept any old trimmer ... or anyone who even just says, "Sure! I can help you with your laminitic pony!" ... No, you want to BE SURE that you find someone knowledgeable and EXPERIENCED!  Every horse is different and every hoof may require something different in terms of corrective and rehabilitative care. 

Now that I've said to make sure the hooves are trimmed CORRECTLY ... that's means NO SHOES! If the horse is shod then you want to have those shoes removed asap. 

Conventional care is usually specifies special orthotic shoes, lock in a deeply bedded stall; withhold all grain and only feed a poor quality grass hay. I've found more success with a more 'natural approach' to treating this condition. 

First, remember, the BEST thing for a hooves is MOVEMENT ... in the first few days after diagnosing you do want your horse to only move as he or she is comfortable in doing. I do NOT recommend giving chemical pain killer of any kind as that may cause the horse to move TOO much, thus, tearing the laminae even more than initial insult. The chemical pain killer can also cause gut issues which would only serve to stress the laminitic condition. 

I recommend turnout 24/7 in a small, flat area; NOT stalled! Do encourage movement as the *horse* wants ... spread out the hay (good quality grass and timothy mix) so the horse can 'graze' at will - as much as the horse wants; Put the water source a ways away from the hay so the horse has to walk to it. Add 1/4 cup of medium hardwood activated charcoal to the water to help pull the offending toxins out of the body. 

If the horse is used to being turned out on grass then a small area of grass grazing can be provided. If the horse is NOT used to grass grazing do NOT turn the horse out to grass!  

Provide an area that IS soft and cushy so if the horse wants to lie down he/she can in comfort. If you can, also provide an area of cool water, dug out pond or small stream in which the horse can stand at will. It that's not possible then you may want to stand your horse in shallow pans of cool water several times a day. Adding a 1/2 cup or so of medium quality, hardwood activated powdered charcoal to the soak is most beneficial!

Something really helpful for the horse is to provide and area of smooth pea stone in which the horse can stand. It provides massaging comfort and when given a choice, that is where most horses will choose to rest.  

You want your horse's hooves to FUNCTION well in order to get that circulation moving through the hooves .. that means good FORM ... which means correct trimming. So that is imperative ... again, find someone who is EXPERIENCED and SUCCESSFUL at rehabbing laminitic horses and does it without shoes! 

If the horse is not moving well, put on boots or other protective measures to cushion the hooves and help comfort. The main idea is to encourage movement at will. 

Do NOT force movement for a few days ... up to 72 hours/6 days. Gentle HAND WALKING several times a day for short periods of time but only if the horse will WILLINGLY walk with you. 

I, personally, use homeopathics and essential oils to help laminitic horses. Plus, I use specific, raw forage diets (fresh veggies, fruits, nuts, seeds, etc.). There are specific remedies to be used with care. If you're interested then please contact me personally about it. :) I am happy to offer consult.

Suffice to say that the reason causing the laminitis must be addressed in order to safely treat it with homeopathics, herbs and oils. So, that part of the treatment is purely individualistic according to each case. The same applies to the diet that is recommend. 

After a few days of rest your horse should be showing improvement. The Acute stage of laminitis lasts only 24 - 72 hours. Once through the acute stage then the condition will either clear up and the hooves will grow out new horn nicely or it may progress into the founder stage. The severity of the lameness directly relates to the severity and extent of the damage to the laminae. If treated aggressively at the first signs of lameness then most can recover fully. 

 A checklist:

--Trim correctly
--Turn out 24/7 
--Free choice good quality grass hay
--MOVEMENT
--Limit or totally eliminate all processed food for at least 72 hours.
--Use anti-inflammatory herbs or essential oils along with homeopathic remedies -       Consult for specific diet, homeopathic and herbal/oil treatments 
--Detox (this can be done homeopathically as well) 


This is the pony described above. You can see the new hoof growth and she's standing very comfortably. This is about 5 months after the initial start of my treatment. 

 

Gwenyth Browning Jones Santagate is the best-selling author of 10 Secrets to Healthy Hooves as well as a noted author for various international equine publications includingThe Horses Hoof, Equine Wellness, Natural Horse Planet as well as a contributing author for the 2001 United States Federal Mounted Border Patrol Training Manual. For the last 37+ years, she has maintained healthy hooves with natural trimming on thousands of horses and specialized in pathological rehabilitation hoofcare for the last 18 years. She and her husband John keep a small herd of their own equine in SW Florida and continue to offer consults for horses in need. For further information please click here:  www.thepenzancehorse.com   Gwenyth also offers an online home-study of Natural Hoofcare 101 ... please go here: www.integrativehorsecourses.com to view information and to register.

https://scootboots.com/blogs/blog/laminitis-what-do-i-do

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