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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ExceedAndExcel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Jul 2019 at 12:06pm
Originally posted by Isaac soloman Isaac soloman wrote:

<h1 itemprop="line" style="-sizing: inherit; padding: 0px; border: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-variant-east-asian: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 1.16667; font-family: "Abril Titling Bold", "Book Antiqua", Palatino, "Palatino Lino", "Palatino LT STD", Georgia, serif; font-size: 3rem; vertical-align: line; color: rgb10, 22, 51;">Xi Jinping's cousin a high roller as Crown comes under pressure over crime, influence</h1>
<p style="-sizing: inherit; padding: 0px; border: 0px; margin: 0px 0px 24px; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-variant-east-asian: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: "PT Serif", Georgia, Times, "Times New Roman", serif; font-size: 18px; vertical-align: line; color: rgb10, 22, 51;">A cousin of Chinese President Xi Jinping was aboard a private jet for high-roller gamblers when it was searched by federal agents on the Gold Coast in 2016 on suspicion that it was involved in international money laundering.

<p style="-sizing: inherit; padding: 0px; border: 0px; margin: 0px 0px 24px; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-variant-east-asian: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: "PT Serif", Georgia, Times, "Times New Roman", serif; font-size: 18px; vertical-align: line; color: rgb10, 22, 51;">The initial target of the police search of the jet’s passengers was an alleged criminal fugitive and business partner of Crown Resorts, Tom Zhou. But the search also revealed that one of Mr Zhou’s travelling companions was Mr Xi's cousin, Ming Chai.Multiple sources have confirmed that police and security agencies, including ASIO, have since made detailed inquiries about why Mr Chai - a Crown resorts “VVIP” (very, very important person) - was aboard the flight with Mr Zhou, who is an alleged crime figure and Communist Party influence operative.

<p style="-sizing: inherit; padding: 0px; border: 0px; margin: 0px; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-variant-east-asian: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: "PT Serif", Georgia, Times, "Times New Roman", serif; font-size: 18px; vertical-align: line; color: rgb10, 22, 51;">A trove of thousands of leaked files from inside the Australian gaming giant shows how Crown and its high-roller agents have encouraged and facilitated the travel to Australia of several figures of interest to police and security agencieshttps://www.watoday.com.au/business/companies/xi-jinping-s-cousin-a-high-roller-as-crown-comes-under-pressure-over-crime-influence-20190726-p52b2s.html






As I just posted in the other thread, this story didn’t reveal anything surprising at all. You don’t think these types of people are hanging around The Star as well? Of course they are!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Isaac soloman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Jul 2019 at 1:56pm
And this is why costs soar.
There must be a better way to do this without host countries missing out?

Chinese investors back major new meatworks for north Queensland

The north west Queensland town of Hughenden hopes an economic boom and jobs boost will materialise after new deeds were signed for developing a meat processing facility.

Key points:

  • A Chinese investment company has committed to the construction of the Hughenden Processing Facility to begin operating in 2022
  • The meat processing plant will process up to 1,000 head of cattle each day and will employ 200 employees
  • Construction is expected to commence in 2020

Chinese investment company CNVM Investments has signed a business plan with Flinders Shire Council representatives to commit to the Hughenden Processing Facility, with operations commencing in 2022.

The council mayor, Jane McNamara, said the contract required reworking after previous attempts, which included two other partners.

"It's been a couple of years now since we had three partners, now it's just the Flinders Shire Council and CNVM going forward with the development of this project," she said.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Passing Through Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Jul 2019 at 1:59pm
What does PM SlyMo say Isaac?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Passing Through Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Jul 2019 at 4:18pm
Hey Isaac, any updates on those peace loving ''protesters'' in Hong Kong?

Have they destroyed the joint yet?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gay3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Jul 2019 at 8:00am

Chinese investors back major new meatworks for north Queensland

Tom Major, Monday July 29, 2019 - 12:17 EST


The north west Queensland town of Hughenden hopes an economic boom and jobs boost will materialise after new deeds were signed for developing a meat processing facility.



Chinese investment company CNVM Investments has signed a business plan with Flinders Shire Council representatives to commit to the Hughenden Processing Facility, with operations commencing in 2022.

The council mayor, Jane McNamara, said the contract required reworking after previous attempts, which included two other partners.

"It's been a couple of years now since we had three partners, now it's just the Flinders Shire Council and CNVM going forward with the development of this project," she said.

"Importantly this new project will provide the opportunity to expand, develop further export channels, and grow the domestic supply chain for Queensland beef into China."

Chief executive of CNVM Investments, Miao Wang, said the success of the meatworks could lead to greater Chinese investment in the future.

"This is a very exciting project not only for CNVM and partners along the supply chain to China, but also for further developing good working relationships," she said.



Expanded plans

An application for a feedlot holding as many as 50,000 cattle will be submitted in order to provide for future growth.

"It will build up to the required number. If you get the licence for a larger number it's easier [in the long-term]," Cr McNamara said.



"With the advancement of we're hoping that some of the fodder required will be sourced locally."

Up to 1,000 head a day will be processed into quarters in Hughenden, before being snap-frozen and shipped to China from the Port of Townsville.

When complete, 200 employees will be needed to operate the works at full capacity.

Cr McNamara said the cattle for lot feeding could be sourced from as far away as the Northern Territory, where Chinese companies are circling

"We will be getting beasts from across north Queensland and the Northern Territory. It's a very good project for the whole of north Queensland," she said.



Operation timeline

The developers hope the necessary State and Commonwealth approvals will be in place by the end of 2019, with construction beginning in 2020.

"I'm sure we have great support from both Federal and State Governments on this proposal," Cr McNamara said.

CNVM Investments is planning to begin operations from the works in 2022.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Passing Through Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Jul 2019 at 8:08am
Scroll up Gay
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Isaac soloman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Jul 2019 at 9:34am

Biosecurity Tasmania boss 'not aware' of cruelty investigations at Chinese dairy giant VDL

Serious allegations of animal cruelty against Australia's largest dairy company — including "eye gouging" of cows and the use of claw hammers to kill calves — have been repeatedly probed by Tasmania's Biosecurity agency, however its boss told a parliamentary estimates hearing that he was "not aware of any complaints".

Key points:

  • VDL, founded in 1825, was bought by Moon Lake Investments in 2016
  • Documents obtained under right to information laws reveal internal emails detailing allegations, and investigations, at VDL's operations
  • Despite being a recipient of internal emails regarding the allegations, Biosecurity's head told Parliament he was "not aware' of any complaints at VDL

The ABC can reveal the allegations, some dating back as far as May 2016, were made against Van Diemen's Land Company's (VDL) dairy business and investigated by the Tasmanian Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment (DPIPWE).

It comes after the ABC recently reported the company — purchased in 2016 by Chinese businessman Lu Xianfeng's Moon Lake Investments — was facing a staff mutiny over serious animal welfare and safety concerns.

The most disturbing allegations were made on October 25, 2017 by someone identified as having previously worked on the property.

In an email exchange, obtained under right to information legislation, the complainant is noted as allegedly witnessing "eye gouging cows … he saw one with its eyeball displaced. A vet is to be called to come and remove the eye completely".

The complainant also alleged "breaking of tails by bending them to force cows … an inventory was done by a female worker and the identified number was of about 50 with broken and injured tails by rough handling".

DPIPWE inspectors carried out an inspection of the property following the complaint but did not find any evidence of any widespread animal cruelty, although about 10 cows were identified as having broken tails. A VDL employee said the "injuries were sustained under a previous owner".

A complaint received by the department on March 6, 2019 alleged 400 to 500 calves had no bedding and were "placed in a shed on gravel".

Biosecurity head 'not aware', despite emails

In response, the department said that accusation was "unsubstantiated" and after a visit to the properties in April this year the same inspector commented in an email on April 18 that "overall, the cattle looked in good health and had very good body condition score".

When the general manager of DPIPWE's Biosecurity Tasmania Lloyd Klumpp was questioned in Tasmanian Parliamentary Estimates on June 6, 2019 about whether there were animal welfare concerns at VDL's farm, he responded: "I am not aware of a complaint around Van Diemen's Land."

Dr Klumpp told the estimates hearing "there may well be complaints, but I am not aware of them, I can't talk about individual investigations while they are happening".

However, emails show that Dr Klumpp was emailed a copy of the October 2017 complaint by his department, with the subject line "Re: animal cruelty complaint about Van Diemen's Land".

In a statement, a DPIPWE spokesperson said Dr Klumpp's "answer was provided in the context that there are hundreds complaints received by the agency each year, for example there were 289 complaints received in 2018 alone".

"While some complaints have been made in relation to VDL, these have been followed up and no evidence of breaches of the Animal Welfare Act were found during these inspections.

"The email that Dr Klumpp was copied in was in relation to following up allegations made in 2017, where no evidence was found of breaches of the Animal Welfare Act."

Tasmanian Greens leader Cassy O'Connor called on Dr Klumpp and Biosecurity Tasmanian to take action.

"We need to know there's a thorough root and branch inspection and investigation of VDL … we want by Biosecurity Tasmania to do its job," she said.

"We want them there conducting unannounced visits … and being really transparent about what they find."

The Greens have partnered with independent Senator Jacqui Lambie and independent Lower House MP Andrew Wilkie in a new motion in the Senate that calls upon the Federal Government to compel Moon Lake to "invest the outstanding amount of the promised $100 million into VDL farms by 31 July 2020".

In 2016, Moon Lake paid $280 million for the Van Diemen's Land Company, after then-treasurer Scott Morrison approved the foreign investment, with the Chinese company pledging to invest $100 million and create an additional 95 local jobs — but Mr Lu recently admitted that neither of those undertakings had been fulfilled.

"We have a totally unacceptable situation in Tasmania and in this country where we have foreign investment laws that aren't worth the paper they're written on," Greens senator Peter Whish-Wilson said.

"It's totally unacceptable to all Australians and all Tasmanians that we can have a Government that refuses to enforce the conditions that they put on the purchase of a Tasmanian farm that's supposed to be in the national interest."

Lambie, Wilkie, Greens unite in Senate motion

Federal MP Andrew Wilkie rejected claims that retrospectively making undertakings enforceable would potentially scare off future foreign investors from making purchases.

"What this does is it sends a clear signal to companies to foreign investors, that if they're going to come into our country they need to abide by our laws, they need to honour their promises … and if they don't honour the promises they've made, they'll be held to account," he said.

Ms Lambie said the pressure was now on Labor, and particularly its shadow Agriculture Minister Joel Fitzgibbon, to support the motion.

"I certainly think it would be in the best interest of Labor, and Joel himself, to get behind this and support it. It comes down to our national security, to our food security. That's what it comes down to … and we're not putting up with it."

On its website, VDL states it is "committed to ensuring that not only do we fully comply with our legal obligations with regard to animal welfare, but that we will adopt best practice in respect of animal welfare".

"Any breach of Tasmanian Government animal welfare laws and Australian Government livestock transport standards, or failure to treat animals humanely is completely unacceptable to our business.

"This policy is not simply concerned with ensuring the absence of cruelty and disease; we have an obligation and a requirement to treat animals humanely, recognising that they are beings capable of feeling, and for which we have an ethical responsibility," the website states.https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-07-30/biosecurity-boss-unaware-over-cruelty-probes-at-vdl-dairy/11362930

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Isaac soloman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Jul 2019 at 4:12pm
thank goodness.

Australia declares China's plan for Antarctic conduct has 'no formal standing'

Australia's Government has deflated China's ambition to manage the summit of the Antarctic ice sheet, an area within Australia's Antarctic claim.

Key points:

  • China wants to administer an area deep inside Australia's Antarctic claim
  • Beijing's proposal for a code of conduct at "Dome A", a high point on the continent, was discussed this month in Prague
  • Australia's Government has declared China's draft code has "no formal standing" within the Antarctic Treaty System

Countries involved in Antarctic affairs met in the Czech Republic this month for their annual diplomatic get-together, and China's proposal was the subject of discussions.

The bid from China to implement a code of conduct at "Dome A" — some 4,000 metres above sea level — was not supported by Australia.

Dome A has been recognised as perhaps the best location for space observation on Earth due to its high elevation and outstanding visibility.

China's draft code tabled at the meeting "has no formal standing in the Antarctic Treaty System", according to a statement by a Department of Foreign Affairs spokesperson provided to the ABC.

In Antarctica multiple nations sometimes access the same areas for science. One nation or a group of nations take on responsibility for how this occurs.

China's proposed code is the latest attempt by Beijing to manage activity in this remote location. China is the only nation with a base in the area.

It originally proposed a "specially managed area" five years ago to protect the local environment and coordinate activities in this region.

But after failing to win over Antarctic nations, China replaced that proposal with a draft code of conduct two years ago.

Following this month's meeting in Prague, that too appears to have hit a dead end.

"Australia has consistently argued that any code proposed by China cannot bind third countries," DFAT's spokesperson said.

A report submitted by China at the meeting "expressed its regret that it still seems difficult to develop a [code of conduct] which would satisfy everyone after its many efforts for years".

The Antarctic Treaty requires consensus among nations before new administrative measures, such as codes of conduct, can be implemented.

Antarctic Treaty meetings are closed to media and the positions of nations on individual issues are rarely revealed.

Map of Antarctica showing Australian Territory and the location of Dome A, near the South Pole.

Debate over sovereignty

Anne-Marie Brady, a polar politics researcher from the University of Canterbury who was in Prague, said China argued its code of conduct applied only to Chinese personnel, "but the stipulations parallel what was in their original proposal".

"Any new governance initiative is watched closely by other Antarctic states in case it sets a precedent, so there would have been concerns about the potential of the code of conduct at the recent [meeting] in https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-07-30/antarctica-china-code-of-conduct-dome-a/11318646

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gay3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Jul 2019 at 6:53pm

High-rolling tourists are being invited to hunt and kill wombats at a luxury hunting lodge run by a Chinese businessman who is a Crown casino partner with alleged crime links.

Appearing in English as ‘Dude Ranch’ on Google Maps, from the front the property has a driveway that, apart from security signs, doesn’t look too out of place in the picturesque Victorian shire of Murrindindi, about 100 kms north-east of Melbourne.

But utes and tractors aren’t the most common vehicles passing through the CCTV-monitored gates. Instead, stretch limousines with blacked-out windows are often spotted coming and going.

The appearance of luxury cars on the dirt road has attracted the attention of nearby residents in the past year. Gun fire ringing out from the property had them curious.

Then a dead animal in a nearby paddock raised their suspicions.

Now, an investigation by Channel Nine media has revealed the owner of the mysterious hunting lodge to be Tom Zhou, a wealthy Chinese businessman, international fugitive and associate of Crown casinos.

Locals are scared.

Zhou has strong ties to the Chinese Communist Party and, according to the newspaper reports, is wanted in China for financial crime that has netted him tens of millions of dollars.

He is the subject of an Interpol notice and is supposed to be arrested immediately if he crosses a country’s border.

Instead, he owns luxury houses in Melbourne and the high-end shooting range on a 809-hectare (2000 acre) property backing on to Murrindindi Scenic Reserve, in the state’s north-east.

“They’re not just rich; they’re rich high-rollers coming in luxury cars,” one neighbour told The New Daily.

Tourists have tagged themselves at the Murrindindi property on Google

“These tourists are coming in as gun-toting John Waynes.”

Authorities have the property on their radar, and police are investigating whether crimes have been committed there.

“Victoria Police is aware of reports of illegal hunting at a Murrindindi property,” spokeswoman Leonie Johnson said.

On the company’s website, translated from Mandarin, Zhou’s shooting range boasts an authentic Australian tourist experience for Chinese trophy hunters.

“When we come to Australia, we should experience life that we can’t experience in China,” it reads.

“The first thing that should be felt in Australia is to be a wilderness hunter in the mountains of Australia.”


Visitors without any shooting experience need not worry – the website assures tourists that “even if you don’t have any shooting experience, it doesn’t matter”.

“With professional guidance, you will be a great shooter!” it reads.

“Hares, foxes, wombats, wild ducks, red deer, sambars (deer) … a variety of wild animals to spend a happy holiday with you.”

A screenshot of the shooting range website depicting a wombat.

A Melbourne man, who owns a property in the Shire, told The New Daily he was shocked the business was encouraging tourists to come here and shoot wombats.

“Wombats are a native animal,” he said.

“They travel at a max speed of what you and I can walk at … how can you put a picture of a wombat on the website?”

Common wombats are a protected species in Victoria, except in 193 districts including Murrindindi where the animals have been declared unprotected wildlife.

Tensions are boiling over in the tight-knit community, with neighbours reporting they feel “scared” of unlicensed and inexperienced shooters firing powerful weapons close to their properties.

Horse and cattle breeders are particularly worried, with some saying they fear their animals are being “spooked” by the regular sound of high-calibre gun fire and are struggling to breed.

Despite the concerns from locals, it appears the owners of the hunting grounds are not planning to shut down any time soon; instead, they want to expand.

A planning application submitted to Murrindindi Shire Council shows Zhou wants to build a large hotel and a function complex on the property that will include a bar, restaurant and a gym.

Residents have indicated they will lodge an objection.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Isaac soloman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Aug 2019 at 12:01pm
gee i hope they miss and shoot each other.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Passing Through Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Aug 2019 at 3:51pm
Hey Isaac, how are those freedom loving youth protesters going in Hong Kong? 

Have they burned the joint down yet? I am starting to lose sympathy for their cause, which by the way was resolved weeks ago.

How long before the Chinese govt is justified in sending troops there to clean the joint up?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Isaac soloman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Aug 2019 at 4:47pm
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-08-05/push-to-nationalise-darwin-port/11382422

Push for Darwin Port to be nationalised to end Chinese ownership of strategic northern asset

A Labor MP has become the first federal politician to call for the controversial Chinese lease on Darwin Port to be scrapped, so it can be placed back into Australian control.

Key points:

  • Labor's Nick Champion leading charge to 'nationalise' Darwin Port in a view shared across the political divide
  • Push comes amid concerns over Beijing's steady military build-up in the Indo-Pacific region
  • Mr Champion rejects suggestions move to nationalise the port would unnecessarily anger China

South Australian backbencher Nick Champion is leading the charge to "nationalise" the strategic northern access point, but the ABC has spoken to others across the political divide who share his concerns.

"I think there was not enough consideration of the national interest in that particular privatisation of this port," Mr Champion told the ABC.

In 2015, the Northern Territory Government announced Chinese company Landbridge had been awarded a 99-year lease of Darwin port in a $500 million deal.

Concerns over Beijing's steady military build-up in the Indo-Pacific region have since prompted renewed concerns about the foreign ownership of Australia's northern-most port.

At top-level talks in Sydney over the weekend, the Australian Government again joined the United States in expressing alarm over reports China is moving to establish a new military base in a Cambodian port.

Mr Champion, who is the deputy chair of Federal Parliament's Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Committee, believes the Commonwealth should now consider buying Darwin Port back.

"It's a very important port because we have significant defence facilities in the Northern Territory and that's the part of the world I guess we have to pay a great deal of attention to," he said.

"We should look pretty clearly at making sure that that port is in government hands, and it's for those reasons I think it should be nationalised."

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Passing Through Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Aug 2019 at 4:54pm
Yeah but the kids in HK?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Redemption Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Aug 2019 at 6:37pm
Originally posted by Passing Through Passing Through wrote:

Hey Isaac, how are those freedom loving youth protesters going in Hong Kong? 

Have they burned the joint down yet? I am starting to lose sympathy for their cause, which by the way was resolved weeks ago.

How long before the Chinese govt is justified in sending troops there to clean the joint up?

Wow, really PT?
Hong Kong people dont want to be ruled by the oppressive Communist China, and you think Hong Kong people are bad for wanting a democracy???

Funny that, you support the DEMOCRATS in America.

Mmmmmmmmm  Confused
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gay3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Aug 2019 at 7:12pm
Originally posted by Isaac soloman Isaac soloman wrote:

gee i hope they miss and shoot each other.


They're Chinese Isaac, not Americans Wink
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Passing Through Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Aug 2019 at 7:21pm
We need new emoticons Gay. LOL
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Isaac soloman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Aug 2019 at 10:23am

A young doctor visited China in 1959 and now his diagnosis is coming to pass in Hong Kong

By political editor Andrew Probyn

Updated about an hour ago

Sixty years ago, a young Melbourne doctor did what very few Westerners did at the time. He went to China.

An adventurous soul, John Hamilton spent five years overseas, punctuating his world travels with spells as a ship's doctor.

In February 1959, as he listened to Richie Benaud's XI slug it out with Peter May's England side in the fifth and final Test at the MCG, Dr Hamilton wrote his regular weekly letter to his parents back in Dandenong, Victoria.

His observations of China, made two years into Chairman Mao's economically disastrous Great Leap Forward, were astonishingly prescient. Not just of the rise of China, but how its advance would go hand in hand with a particular brand of authoritarianism.

With Hong Kong now on a bloody precipice 22 years after it was handed back to the Chinese by the British, and with Xi Jinping's retaliation to protesters seemingly imminent, the Melbourne doctor's assessment from all those years ago is acute.

"Now for some impressions of the Chinese People's Republic, as it is called," Dr Hamilton wrote as he sailed from Qingdao to Hong Kong on the British cargo ship the MV Glenartney on February 14, 1959.

He'd spent about three days in Qingdao, or Tsing-Tao as he spelled it, after a week or so in Shanghai and other Chinese port cities.

"The biggest impression is one of rapid industrialisation," he wrote. "There is no-one not working — no beggars seen etc (particularly as this is a crime). Everyone wearing the same dress: blue serge buttoned up to a high collar. No distinction made between male or female in dress or in work.

"There was no laughter either, all hushed and quiet and busy. No-one would look at us even, and if small children approached their elders dragged them away. There were a tremendous number of people in uniforms of the army or navy.

"Everyone is subjected to continuous propaganda over loudspeakers installed everywhere. This is of the two main forms: (1) how they will crush the imperialists by economic means; (2) how 'great and bountiful' China was about to (become) in the next 12 years and pass the imperialists in production."

Chinese officials censoring visitors

Dr Hamilton, my late father-in-law, was a seasoned traveller by the time he visited China, having worked in New York, Trinidad and Britain in between extensive ventures through Asia, Europe and parts of Africa.

Communist China made quite the impact on 28-year-old Dr Hamilton. As he always did, he took photographs of what he saw. Not all of them survive.

He lost a roll of slide film when he was temporarily detained by an official who thought he was spying on warships in Shanghai.

But they could not censor what he saw.

"All their posters depict either imagined scenes of the future or of stimulus to greater production, or the squashing, shooting or hanging of the Imperialist, particularly ones wearing a hat marked US," he wrote.

"When we reached each port we were each personally checked then all herded into the lounge — Chinese crew and all — and then a thorough search of the ship made lasting several hours.

"The same occurred on leaving. Only those with sailor cards, as I have, were allowed ashore and although one could walk the streets one could only shop at the Seaman's Club set up by their government.

"Any photos taken had to be developed by them and viewed before one could get the negative.

"Impression — these people more than any others are to be reckoned with in 20 years. They will be able to achieve a lot because the nature of the mass of the people is submissive and always has been and there are 600 million of them."

Remember, he wrote this in 1959. Twenty years later, Deng Xiaoping introduced market-based economic principles to the anaemic Chinese economy, opening up his impoverished nation to foreign investment and, more significantly, returning the control of land back to peasants.

Deng's reforms — which enabled an economic miracle that lifted millions out of poverty — started the West's delusion that market economy reforms and exposure to the international way of doing business would inevitably democratise China. This has never materialised.

China's social contract with its people since Deng has been prosperity. In that, it has triumphed.

But this never came with a promise of political reform or progressive personal freedom. Beijing's bloody Tiananmen Square crackdown of 1989, ordered under Deng, showed this.

Now the world waits anxiously to see how the Chinese Communist Party will react to the democratic uprising in Hong Kong.

Contending with the 'Dragons of the East'

Chinese President Xi Jinping was five when Dr Hamilton visited China and 26 when Deng appointed Xi's reformist father Xi Zhongxun to establish special experimental zones for economic reforms, including Shenzhen, which lies across the river from Hong Kong.

That experiment was a grand success, somewhat lost amid the extraordinary, world-changing transformation of China from communist economic laggard to global superpower.

Shenzhen, once a sleepy fishing village, has slowly sapped the lifeblood from its river cousin city.

Its economic might, inspired and sourced from the trading systems that made Hong Kong one of the Dragons of the East, saw it overtake the former British colony on economic output last year.

It has passed the production of the imperialists' former stronghold, just as those posters seen by Dr Hamilton predicted in 1959.

Xi has completed his father's transformation of Shenzhen, eroding but not eliminating Hong Kong's importance to the Chinese economy.

Chinese-directed Hong Kong crackdown looms

Hong Kong's protesters now challenge Xi's personal authority and defy the command of the Chinese Communist Party, which warned on Tuesday that the city had been pushed towards a "dangerous abyss".

"We would like to make clear to the very small group of unscrupulous and violent criminals and the dirty forces behind them: those who play with fire will perish by it," China's Hong Kong affairs office warned ominously.

Observers worry what comes next.

"I fear the current situation could end badly for Hong Kong's people," said Peter Jennings, executive director of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute.

It is hard not to agree. In the short arc of post-war Chinese history, its rulers have been intolerant of dissent.

"So this could end with the People's Liberation Army marching into Hong Kong to assert their brutal authority. The only good thing is that this will expose Beijing's Leninist authoritarian regime for what it is," Mr Jennings said.

"Australian fretting about Chinese economic 'punishment' will take a back seat to global revulsion if Xi creates his own Tiananmen Square moment in the streets of Hong Kong."

As Dr Hamilton wrote all those years ago, China is indeed to be reckoned with.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Passing Through Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Aug 2019 at 4:11pm
This cant be right Isaac. These young innocent protesters out smashing and destroying stuff for the 10th weekend straight are  throwing petrol bombs at police in Hong Kong?


HKSAR gov't condemns violence as protesters hurl petrol bombs

Source: Xinhua| 2019-08-12 13:31:12|Editor: huaxia

Photo taken on Aug. 11, 2019 shows an injured Hong Kong police officer. One police officer was seriously injured as gasoline bombs were thrown at police officers at multiple locations in Hong Kong on Sunday night. (Xinhua)

"We are outraged by the violent protesters' behaviours which showed a total disregard of the law, posing a serious threat to the safety of police officers and other members of the public," a spokesperson of the HKSAR government said. "We severely condemn the acts."

HONG KONG, Aug. 12 (Xinhua) -- The Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) government in early morning of Monday condemned violent acts of protesters occurring on Sunday, with some even hurling petrol bombs, causing injuries of a police officer.

In unlawful assemblies in various districts, violent protesters vandalized public property, blocked roads, besieged police stations, and aimed laser beams and hurled bricks to attack police officers, a spokesperson of the HKSAR government said in a statement.

"We are outraged by the violent protesters' behaviours which showed a total disregard of the law, posing a serious threat to the safety of police officers and other members of the public," the spokesperson said. "We severely condemn the acts."

http://xinhuanet.com/english/2019-08/12/c_138302900.htm

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gay3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Aug 2019 at 4:35pm

A young doctor visited China in 1959 and now his diagnosis is coming to pass in Hong Kong

By political editor Andrew Probyn

Updated

Sixty years ago, a young Melbourne doctor did what very few Westerners did at the time. He went to China.

An adventurous soul, John Hamilton spent five years overseas, punctuating his world travels with spells as a ship's doctor.

In February 1959, as he listened to Richie Benaud's XI slug it out with Peter May's England side in the fifth and final Test at the MCG, Dr Hamilton wrote his regular weekly letter to his parents back in Dandenong, Victoria.

His observations of China, made two years into Chairman Mao's economically disastrous Great Leap Forward, were astonishingly prescient. Not just of the rise of China, but how its advance would go hand in hand with a particular brand of authoritarianism.

With Hong Kong now on a bloody precipice 22 years after it was handed back to the Chinese by the British, and with Xi Jinping's retaliation to protesters seemingly imminent, the Melbourne doctor's assessment from all those years ago is acute.

"Now for some impressions of the Chinese People's Republic, as it is called," Dr Hamilton wrote as he sailed from Qingdao to Hong Kong on the British cargo ship the MV Glenartney on February 14, 1959.

He'd spent about three days in Qingdao, or Tsing-Tao as he spelled it, after a week or so in Shanghai and other Chinese port cities.

"The biggest impression is one of rapid industrialisation," he wrote. "There is no-one not working — no beggars seen etc (particularly as this is a crime). Everyone wearing the same dress: blue serge buttoned up to a high collar. No distinction made between male or female in dress or in work.

"There was no laughter either, all hushed and quiet and busy. No-one would look at us even, and if small children approached their elders dragged them away. There were a tremendous number of people in uniforms of the army or navy.

"Everyone is subjected to continuous propaganda over loudspeakers installed everywhere. This is of the two main forms: (1) how they will crush the imperialists by economic means; (2) how 'great and bountiful' China was about to (become) in the next 12 years and pass the imperialists in production."

Chinese officials censoring visitors

Dr Hamilton, my late father-in-law, was a seasoned traveller by the time he visited China, having worked in New York, Trinidad and Britain in between extensive ventures through Asia, Europe and parts of Africa.

Communist China made quite the impact on 28-year-old Dr Hamilton. As he always did, he took photographs of what he saw. Not all of them survive.

He lost a roll of slide film when he was temporarily detained by an official who thought he was spying on warships in Shanghai.

But they could not censor what he saw.

"All their posters depict either imagined scenes of the future or of stimulus to greater production, or the squashing, shooting or hanging of the Imperialist, particularly ones wearing a hat marked US," he wrote.

"When we reached each port we were each personally checked then all herded into the lounge — Chinese crew and all — and then a thorough search of the ship made lasting several hours.

"The same occurred on leaving. Only those with sailor cards, as I have, were allowed ashore and although one could walk the streets one could only shop at the Seaman's Club set up by their government.

"Any photos taken had to be developed by them and viewed before one could get the negative.

"Impression — these people more than any others are to be reckoned with in 20 years. They will be able to achieve a lot because the nature of the mass of the people is submissive and always has been and there are 600 million of them."

Remember, he wrote this in 1959. Twenty years later, Deng Xiaoping introduced market-based economic principles to the anaemic Chinese economy, opening up his impoverished nation to foreign investment and, more significantly, returning the control of land back to peasants.

Deng's reforms — which enabled an economic miracle that lifted millions out of poverty — started the West's delusion that market economy reforms and exposure to the international way of doing business would inevitably democratise China. This has never materialised.

China's social contract with its people since Deng has been prosperity. In that, it has triumphed.

But this never came with a promise of political reform or progressive personal freedom. Beijing's bloody Tiananmen Square crackdown of 1989, ordered under Deng, showed this.

Now the world waits anxiously to see how the Chinese Communist Party will react to the democratic uprising in Hong Kong.

Contending with the 'Dragons of the East'

Chinese President Xi Jinping was five when Dr Hamilton visited China and 26 when Deng appointed Xi's reformist father Xi Zhongxun to establish special experimental zones for economic reforms, including Shenzhen, which lies across the river from Hong Kong.

That experiment was a grand success, somewhat lost amid the extraordinary, world-changing transformation of China from communist economic laggard to global superpower.

Shenzhen, once a sleepy fishing village, has slowly sapped the lifeblood from its river cousin city.

Its economic might, inspired and sourced from the trading systems that made Hong Kong one of the Dragons of the East, saw it overtake the former British colony on economic output last year.

It has passed the production of the imperialists' former stronghold, just as those posters seen by Dr Hamilton predicted in 1959.

Xi has completed his father's transformation of Shenzhen, eroding but not eliminating Hong Kong's importance to the Chinese economy.

Chinese-directed Hong Kong crackdown looms

Hong Kong's protesters now challenge Xi's personal authority and defy the command of the Chinese Communist Party, which warned on Tuesday that the city had been pushed towards a "dangerous abyss".

"We would like to make clear to the very small group of unscrupulous and violent criminals and the dirty forces behind them: those who play with fire will perish by it," China's Hong Kong affairs office warned ominously.

Observers worry what comes next.

"I fear the current situation could end badly for Hong Kong's people," said Peter Jennings, executive director of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute.

It is hard not to agree. In the short arc of post-war Chinese history, its rulers have been intolerant of dissent.

"So this could end with the People's Liberation Army marching into Hong Kong to assert their brutal authority. The only good thing is that this will expose Beijing's Leninist authoritarian regime for what it is," Mr Jennings said.

"Australian fretting about Chinese economic 'punishment' will take a back seat to global revulsion if Xi creates his own Tiananmen Square moment in the streets of Hong Kong."

As Dr Hamilton wrote all those years ago, China is indeed to be reckoned with.

Experience is something you gain a few minutes after you could have used it!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Passing Through Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Aug 2019 at 7:33am
Meanwhile in news from the Australian Liberal Parties arm of the People's Republic of China:

Australian Liberal MP Gladys Liu's links to secretive United Front Chinese influence arm

By Dan Oakes, Echo Hui and Sarah Curnow, ABC Investigations

Updated 59 minutes ago

Ties linking new Federal Liberal MP Gladys Liu to a secretive international influence arm of the Chinese Government have been uncovered by the ABC.

Key points:

  • Liberal MP Gladys Liu has been tied to an organisation linked to China's United Front
  • United Front forms part of Beijing's over-arching strategy for influencing foreign governments and expatriate Chinese
  • Ms Liu said she only joined the organisation to help promote trade and resigned in 2016

Ms Liu, who made history after becoming the first Chinese-Australian woman to gain a seat in the Lower House, was appointed honorary chairman of a Hong Kong-based organisation that experts say is affiliated with China's efforts to exert influence on foreign governments and expatriate Chinese.

Liberal Party elder Bruce Atkinson, a Victorian MP and former Upper House President, has similarly been connected to the same organisation — World Trade United Foundation (WTUF) — for some years.

Mr Atkinson said he played no active role in the organisation and denied he had in any way been a vehicle of Chinese influence in Australian politics.

Ms Liu simply said she joined the WTUF in order to "support the promotion of trade between Australia and Hong Kong" and that she resigned from the group "around 2016". more...


https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-08-14/liberal-gladys-liu-linked-to-secretive-chinese-influence-network/11288210

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Passing Through Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Aug 2019 at 7:36am
Isaac desperately trying to find a Labor connection to the China/Liberal Party


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dr E Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Aug 2019 at 6:10pm
Shanghai Sam, Bullgelati Bill ...
In reference to every post in the Trump thread ... "There may have been a tiny bit of license taken there" ... Ok, Thanks for the "heads up" PT!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Isaac soloman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Aug 2019 at 7:02pm
What are the communist capitalists up to now?
Anything for a buck.....

New Zealanders warned about the consumption of 'sexy pavement lichen'

Botanists in New Zealand are warning the public not to consume lichen growing on footpaths and shady rocks throughout the country, after misleading stories about its stimulatory properties spread rapidly online.The University of Otago lichenologist Dr Allison Knight dubbed a common species of local lichen “sexy pavement lichen” after discovering it was being promoted as a natural alternative to Viagra in online marketplaces, especially in China.

The plants scientific name is Xanthoparmelia scabrosa, and while it could have some properties that are similar to Viagra, Knight said, it can also be “somewhat toxic”.

Lichen found on footpaths can also be tainted by inner-city pollutants such as dog urine and excrement, car exhaust, arsenic, mercury and lead.

The lichen in question is a species that only grows in New Zealand and the Pacific, most often in urban areas, and there are hundreds of products selling it in pill and powder form on the Chinese online marketplace Alibaba, retailing for anywhere between US$12-300 per kilogram.

Knight said most of the products available online were made up of 80% Viagra and 20% grass clippings. To her knowledge no rigorous testing had been done of the “sexy pavement” lichen to prove its efficacy or safety for human consumption.

Knight’s tongue-in-cheek name for the species has been adopted by website inaturalist, a popular global scientific initiative by the California Academy of Sciences and the National Geographic Society which describes itself as a place to “identify the plants and animals”.

“It hasn’t ever really been tested, and it is somewhat toxic, so it is not advisable to consume it. But it is a precursor to Viagra, however large quantities could indeed be very harmful” Knight told the Guardian.

New Zealand botanist Dr Peter de Lange also derided the therapeutic qualities of the plant, telling the Newsroom website that its effect on sexual function could be opposite of what was hoped for.

But Knight said lichen could have huge health benefits. “It doesn’t occur all over the world, it doesn’t even occur in China where all these vast quantities are coming from. But lichen does have huge potential, and there is a lot of research underway to see how they can be used for the next generation of antibiotics to replace the ones we are becoming resistant too.”

There are at least 20,000 varieties of lichen known worldwide, 2,000 of which grow in New Zealand, especially on shady footpaths, the trunks of fruit trees and in native forests. Like much of New Zealand unique flora, some varieties and species of lichen are now endangered or under threat.

“It is nice to focus people’s attention on lichens, I always say they are hidden in full view,” said Knight

“They tend to be understudied and underreported. They’re under-recognised, and they’re very important because they are the colonisers – they are the first things that will colonise bare rock. When life came out of the ocean … there was lichen.”https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/world/new-zealanders-warned-about-the-consumption-of-sexy-pavement-lichen/ar-AAFPCh7

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Brudder_A Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Aug 2019 at 5:49pm
In Sydney, the pro-China camp will push ahead with their planned rally on Saturday in Belmore Park — the same location the pro-Hong Kong camp will host their demonstration on Sunday.

hmmm

The action will start prior to the running of the Premiers Cup Prelude...

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Isaac soloman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 hours 26 minutes ago at 3:57pm

China’s Dire Straits: No Brothers in Arms – Part One

  • China’s economic and trade “free ride” is well and truly over.
  • It is also encountering pushback from regional countries, and especially so by the United States.
  • President Trump appears to wish to confront China at every stage and in every way.
  • China needs its trade with the US, however. Without that trade, it would find itself with a very small trade surplus, which would derail its growth plans.Having cast off the Deng-era policy of not taking the lead in world affairs and of biding its time, China under Chairman Xi Jinping has adopted instead one of seemingly deliberate aggressiveness. (It has been brought to the attention of this writer that there is no “president” in China; Mr Xi has three titles, one of those translating to “Chairman of the Country”. See here for more information.) That policy has now encountered pushback by countries in China’s immediate neighbourhood and much further away. While some of the countries in China’s immediate neighbourhood, such as those that are members of the Association of South-East Asian Nations, have chosen not to take an aggressive stance of their own against Beijing, they have made it evident that they will not be entirely cowed by its overwhelming economic and military might. Larger countries, such as India, have confronted Chinese actions on occasion, while other major players, such as the European Union, appear to have now decided to counter some of China’s aggression. It is the United States under the Trump presidency that has, however, taken the most aggressive anti-China stance of all, deliberately working to contain China’s bid for worldwide influence by enhancing its own military and economic might.

    Beijing has since realised that its “free ride”, as President Trump terms it, is more or less over. The American president has set in motion several efforts aimed at countering China’s bid for international influence. Previous US presidents acquiesced to various Chinese demands, its flouting and bending of international law and established rules and turned a blind eye to its aggressive policies in the hope that further engagement with a liberal international system would see China also become more liberal and less authoritarian. President Trump, however, has adopted a much harder stance against China. He has imposed tariffs on Chinese-sourced imports, terminated its strategy of using third countries to dump even more of its state-financed over-production to the US – thereby undercutting local manufacturers, putting them out of business and destroying employment opportunities in the US, thus weakening its overall economy – and, more recently, declared it a currency manipulator.

    Although it is unlikely that these measures, by themselves, have had the effect of slowing China’s economic growth – estimates of its GDP growth in 2018 have ranged from the official 6.6%, which is unlikely, to less than half of that, a far cry from the double-digit growth figures of previous years – they remain a particularly nasty thorn in China’s side. That situation, coupled with President Trump’s efforts to re-invigorate the US military and his withdrawal from initiatives such as the Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces Treaty with Russia, which precluded the construction of nuclear-capable missiles with ranges of five hundred to 5,500 kilometres, worry Beijing, since the US can now counter its own missiles that fall within that bracket, an estimated 80 per cent of its missile force.

    Chairman Xi is, in short, under tremendous economic, political and military pressure. Recognising that the US is playing thttp://www.futuredirections.org.au/publication/chinas-dire-straits-no-brothers-in-arms-part-one/

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