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carbon tax

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Browndog Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Jul 2013 at 10:20am
Originally posted by questions questions wrote:

you can say it. does not make it true


Not me saying it, Abbott said it repeatedly. Do you actually read newspapers or watch the news?
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  • AAP
  • JUNE 14, 2012 2:39PM

SCRAPPING the carbon tax is easy and a future coalition government will not hesitate in calling a double dissolution election if it is frustrated in the move by a hostile Senate, Opposition Leader Tony Abbott says.

Mr Abbott said suggestions that it might be difficult for a future coalition government to repeal the tax were wrong.

"What parliament has done, parliament can undo," he told a community forum in Adelaide today.

"Getting rid of the carbon tax is as simple as getting legislation through the parliament."

Mr Abbott said the next election would essentially be a referendum on the carbon tax and if Labor lost the party was unlikely to "commit suicide twice" by continuing to back the tax.

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/breaking-news/abbott-says-scrapping-carbon-tax-is-easy/story-e6frf7ko-1226395623763

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote scamanda Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Jul 2013 at 12:26pm
Labor's jewel in the crown, aka carbon tax, to be cut by Rudd.

I started with nothing and still have most of it left
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote VOYAGER Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Jul 2013 at 1:13pm
That is what Rudd says now Wink
 
Very poor piece of policy that should never have been implemented in the first place. AETS is much better, it allows the market to formulate and manipulate the price, so in other words the government can not be called ruining business because it is business who are creating supply and demand and therefore making the price, and we still get some financial compensation for business poullting our enivronment.
 
I actually had no problem with the Carbon tax, it was how it was structured and the actual price which I found the poor part of the policy.
 
Still not sure how Australia is not a leader on this issue but of course I am still confused as to how Tony Abbott is about 6 weeks away from becoming prime minister.
 
Has anyone checked if hell has frozen over!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
Remember, it might take intelligence to be smart , but it takes experience to be wise
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mc41 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Jul 2013 at 6:05pm

Reinforcing these perceptions, our research shows that:

-- Of those who believe climate change is happening, approximately nine in 10 (and a majority of all Australians) think that we are experiencing impacts in Australia and believe that humans are partly or wholly the cause – and the proportion who think humans are the cause is on the rise.

-- Most Australians agree that further extreme weather events as a result of climate change will cause cost of living rises in Australia, such as increased food prices and higher insurance premiums.

-- Most Australians think that governments need to do more to address climate change (largely because individually they feel somewhat helpless in the face of such a large issue).

-- Support for carbon pricing rises significantly when people are shown the potential outcomes and benefits, especially if this means increased investment in renewable energy and a measurable reduction in carbon pollution.

-- More Australians are in favour of keeping some form of carbon pricing or trading scheme (46 per cent) than are in favour of abolishing it or seeing the Coalition replace it with its Direct Action plan (36 per cent).

The last point may come as a surprise to many, but it reveals that the underlying concern about climate change is real, and should not be ignored.

Failure to raise awareness, understanding and support for carbon pricing does not override voter desire for action on climate change from governments, global alliances, business and the community.

Voters are largely uninspired and unconvinced by Australia’s current climate action policy, but nor do they see wholesale repeal of carbon pricing and lack of action on climate change as a credible strategy for Australia in the future.

So where to from here?

It is certainly not about going back and fixing misperceptions and misunderstanding. It might sound obvious, but the opportunity lies in the future, not the past.

The research behind Climate of the Nation 2013 shows that what gets lost in the climate change debate is the economic opportunity.

Most Australians agree that tackling climate change creates new jobs and investment in clean energy, and most agree that tackling climate change presents a unique economic opportunity for the development and sale of renewable energy technology.

Importantly, an appreciation of the economic benefits, including job creation, associated with a strong renewable energy industry is not contingent on belief in climate change – or even a belief that humans are responsible; even sceptics can appreciate the opportunity to make a buck.

Given our geopolitical and economic status in the world, voters believe Australia can’t afford to be in a position where we are deliberately ceding the chance to refocus our manufacturing and export industries towards developing and supplying increasing global demand for cleaner, greener technology. Jobs and investment are at stake.

It is Australia’s national aspiration to be the smart country. But Australians believe that regressing on the progress we’ve made on carbon pricing will negatively impact Australia’s opportunity to be an early adopter when it comes to the development of smarter and cleaner technologies for export, and there’s nothing smart about that.

A regressive strategy will likely result in a shift in voter frustration over the lost opportunities to boost economic prosperity while simultaneously acting on voters’ very real concerns about the health, environmental and cost and quality of living impacts of climate change.

The research does support a change to the current carbon pricing policy, but the change requires a more effective policy, not abolishing carbon pricing altogether.

John Scales is Managing Director – Research, JWS Research.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote scamanda Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Jul 2013 at 6:18pm
Originally posted by scamanda scamanda wrote:

Labor's jewel in the crown, aka carbon tax, to be cut by Rudd.



OK, where are all the pro Labor/Green people who pushed so hard on the carbon tax here on the forum?

Why aren't you up in arms over Kevin Rudd cutting the carbon tax?
Have we fixed it already?

Or were Labor, the Greens, and their supporters wrong?

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Browndog Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Jul 2013 at 6:38pm
The carbon tax was to transition to an ETA in another year anyway. This just brings it forward 12 months. What's the big deal?We are in front in our emissions reductions. 

Tony should be happy, this will relieve the punters who he claimed were being crucified by the carbon tax Rudd should recall parliament and put this to a vote now, wedge both the Greens and Abbott. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote scamanda Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Jul 2013 at 10:27pm
Originally posted by Browndog Browndog wrote:

The carbon tax was to transition to an ETA in another year anyway. This just brings it forward 12 months. What's the big deal?We are in front in our emissions reductions. 

Tony should be happy, this will relieve the punters who he claimed were being crucified by the carbon tax Rudd should recall parliament and put this to a vote now, wedge both the Greens and Abbott. 

Tony will be happy. Rudd is doing exactly what the coalition has been promising to do for years.
And not just the carbon tax.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Browndog Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Jul 2013 at 11:36am

Our wealth has only grown since the carbon tax

Updated Fri Jul 26, 2013 1:44pm AEST

Despite the dire warnings about the carbon tax, Australia's economy is still growing, creating jobs and registering a quite stunning lift in wealth, writes Stephen Koukoulas.

The carbon price has been a dud. A dud that has supposedly been fuelling an inflation blowout and is wrecking the economy.

News on Wednesday that the annual inflation rate has been a miserly 2.4 per cent in the 12 months since the carbon price was introduced puts paid, once and for all, to the claims that it was going to be an oppressive addition to cost of living pressures.

Furthermore, since the price on carbon came into effect, more than half a trillion dollars has been added to the combined value of housing and stocks listed on the Australian Securities Exchange. That is $500,000,000,000.00, or the equivalent of $22,000 for every man, woman and child, all of which has accrued in just over a year.

And this half a trillion dollar does not include dividends, in the case of stocks, or actual and imputed rent on dwellings. Dividend payments on stocks over that time are around an additional $65 billion or so.

This has been a period of stunning wealth creation in Australia, and more notable given many of the high-profile predictions that the introduction of a price on carbon would have on the economy.

Indeed, most of the high-profile doomsayers were in the leadership group of the Liberal and National Parties.

Opposition Leader Tony Abbott was forecasting that the carbon price would "act as a wrecking ball across the economy" or be an "absolutely catastrophic", and would "wipe out jobs big time" with towns like Whyalla "wiped off the map" because of it. Not only that, but it would create "ghost towns" and "discourage investment" in mining.

Shadow treasurer Joe Hockey was similarly alarmist, suggesting, "It's going to rip the heart and soul out of small business and families."

The half a trillion dollar lift in the stock market and house prices reflects a 23 per cent lift in the ASX since 1 July 2012 which had added approximately $275 billion to the value of stocks, while a 5.1 per cent rise in house prices has added approximately $235 billion to the value of housing over the same timeframe.

This is hardly the stuff of an economic wrecking ball or outcomes that are ripping the heart out of businesses and families. On the contrary, it is a stunning boost.

Mr Abbott also noted that "every time you buy an apple, buy a banana, you pay under Julia Gillard's carbon tax". The recently released inflation data shows fruit prices rose 0.2 per cent in the year to the June quarter 2013, which means that the price of a kilo of apples or bananas has risen by around 1 cent over the past year.

In terms of the jobs results, total employment has risen by 160,400 since the carbon price commenced, which again stands in contrast to the claims from the fear mongers.

Mr Abbott noted that "the truth about this carbon tax is that it's bad for business, it's bad for jobs".

The bottom line of all of this is that the economy is still growing, creating jobs and registering a quite stunning lift in wealth in the period since carbon was priced.

Also important is the recent policy decision of the government to move to an emissions trading scheme a year earlier than scheduled. Treasurer Bowen has estimated that this will cut the inflation rate by 0.5 per cent in 2014-15.

Carbon pricing has had almost no impact on the macroeconomy and inflation remains very low. If it were a "wrecking ball", none of these outcomes would have been recorded.

And it is also worth noting that because of carbon pricing, emissions are falling and renewable energy generation is growing, which is exactly what the policy was meant to do!

It is a near perfect policy for a substantial problem.

Which begs the question: Why change it?

Stephen Koukoulas is a Research Fellow at Per Capita, a progressive think tank. View his full profile here.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Browndog Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Oct 2013 at 6:18am


 

Tony Abbott's new direct action sceptics

Matt Wade, Gareth Hutchens
Published: October 28, 2013 - 6:17AM< id="dcAd-1-2" marginheight="0" marginwidth="0" allowtransparency="true" border="0" height="250" scrolling="no" width="300" style="line-height: 1.4;">

Leading economists have overwhelmingly rejected Tony Abbott's direct action climate change policy and backed carbon pricing.

A Fairfax Media survey of 35 prominent university and business economists found only two believed direct action was the better way to limit Australia's greenhouse gas emissions. Thirty - or 86 per cent - favoured the existing carbon price scheme. Three rejected both schemes.

Internationally renowned Australian economist Justin Wolfers, of the Washingtonbased Brookings Institution and the University of Michigan, said he was surprised that any economists would opt for direct action, under which the government will pay for emissions cuts by businesses and farmers from a budget worth $2.88 billion over four years.

Professor Wolfers said direct action would involve more economic disruption but have a lesser environmental pay-off than an emissions trading scheme, under which big emitters must pay for their pollution.

BT Financial's Dr Chris Caton said any economist who did not opt for emissions trading "should hand his degree back".

The survey comes as the Abbott government prepares to introduce legislation next month to repeal the carbon price scheme and as debate rages over whether climate change is linked to bushfires.

Mr Abbott last week said he accepted climate change was real, but suggestions that it was linked to fires was "complete hogwash".

In 2011, Mr Abbott took a swipe at some who had criticised the Coalition's scheme, ''saying maybe that's a comment on the quality of our economists rather than on the merits of argument''.

The extraordinary challenge of limiting global warming to less than 2 degrees - the level scientists consider necessary - was underlined by a new report by European consultants Ecofys that found Australia would have to cut emissions by at least 27 per cent by 2020 to play its part.

Australia has a bipartisan target of 5 per cent below 2000 levels by 2020. The Climate Change Authority - set up by Labor and which the Coalition plans to abolish - will this week release its draft recommendation on Australia's 2020 target.

The carbon scheme started as a fixed price - or tax - and is due to become an emissions trading scheme in July 2015. A trading scheme places a cap on emissions and requires big emitters to buy a permit for every tonne of carbon dioxide they release. Permits can be traded, allowing businesses that cut emissions to save money.

Several economists surveyed said the weight of international evidence showed that carbon dioxide emissions could be reduced more efficiently through a broadbased market mechanism such as a trading scheme. "That seems to be the way that the major economies are headed - not uniformly, unfortunately," CBA economist Michael Workman said.

Some said the direct action plan would rely too much on bureaucratic decisions. "If I had to make a choice between pricing carbon and having bureaucrats allocating permits, then I'm going to go for the market mechanism every time," said Rob Henderson, a National Australia Bank senior economist.

But Australian National University professor Warwick McKibbin said none of the policies on offer in Australia were sufficiently robust. He said the direct action plan could achieve emission reductions, but at higher cost per unit than a well-designed carbon price.

Professor McKibbin predicted a hybrid policy would eventually be adopted.

University of Queensland professor Paul Frijters, one of two economists who favoured the Coalition approach, said he would not describe it as "direct action" but simply as "no action".

"I think the government's current policy of 'no policy' is exactly the right one to take for a small country like Australia," he said.

Commsec's Craig James, who also supported the Coalition's policy, said the standard economic assumption that markets could solve almost anything was not right. He said markets could fail and might be the wrong response to an environmental problem.

"The attempts that the Europeans have made so far have been less than stellar," Mr James said.

Mr James also said he was sceptical that humans were having a serious impact on climate.

A spokesman for the Environment Minister, Greg Hunt, did not respond directly to the survey results, but said the Australian people had voted to repeal the carbon tax.

"The simple fact is the carbon tax does not work," he said.

"The Coalition Government is committed to reducing Australia's domestic emissions by 5 per cent by 2020. Labor's carbon tax will not achieve this target. Domestic emissions are set to rise from 560m tonnes to 637m tonnes, between 2010 and 2020, under the carbon tax. Labor's carbon tax does a lot of damage to households and businesses, yet it doesn't even do the job."

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Go Flash Go Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Nov 2013 at 7:26am
Been run off my feet lately so no time for the news, did hear a grab that our beloved  Prime Minister Tony Abbott (has a ring to it now doesn't it Smile )
 
- is getting about doing what he was elected to do. Is this Australian politics these days Shocked
 
( heard something about Rudd too )
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote maccamax Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Nov 2013 at 8:57pm
Go Flash Go..   Yes the crying , emotionally destroyed "shim" Has resigned . We will miss him, but not the way he thinks.
Probably the most arrogant waste of good Oxygen we have encountered in Politics.   What a weak wimp.
The Libs should put an Asylum camp right in the middle of the electorate of Griffith to remember the Bastxxxd.
       
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