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Anti-Communist Protests Hong Kong

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Isaac soloman View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Isaac soloman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Sep 2019 at 1:43pm
Does tbv monitor and edit viewers pt?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Passing Through Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Sep 2019 at 1:45pm
Wot??
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Isaac soloman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Sep 2019 at 1:49pm

Big-spending China Inc waits patiently in East Timor, on Australia's doorstep

Dili: Millions of dollars of Chinese heavy machinery and at least 20 Chinese workers are sitting idle on East Timor's south coast, waiting to resume work on multimillion-dollar infrastructure projects.

On a trip to Suai, a town of about 9000 people on East Timor's remote south coast, The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age visited two of the five camps that at their peak housed up to 500 Chinese workers and 1000 locals during construction of the first stage of a sprawling four-lane expressway that will eventually stretch 156 kilometres from Suai to Beaco.The $500 million expressway is part of the $15 billion Tasi Mane project and will link up a series of projects along the south coast that Timor's government is championing.

China's involvement in the project is another example of the super-power's rising influence in south-east Asia and the Pacific.The Tasi Mane project also includes a largely-unused upgraded airport near Suai that receives just three or four flights per week but which is bigger and more modern than the Dili airport.

There are plans for an onshore LNG processing facility at Beaco, a supply depot and a refinery - all of which are yet to be built - and which will link into the as-yet undeveloped $50 billion Greater Sunrise offshore oil and gas field.The dusty, careworn camps are mostly empty now because stage one of the expressway, a 34 kilometre stretch that connects the towns of Suai to Fatucai, was completed in November 2018.

Already, the expressway is nearly unusable in parts because of a landslide blocking two lanes heading in one direction and, further down the road, a section of highway headed in the other direction has collapsed and is passable only by motorcycles.

Motorcycles are banned from the expressway but few people own cars in this part of East Timor. We saw one car and two trucks along the length of the road. A dozen motorcycles and a herd of goats were the only other users of the road.

Funding for stages two to four of the expressway has not come through yet from Dili, which is struggling to raise the money to finance all of Tasi Mane. Senior politicians in Dili have said they would welcome Chinese investment in these other projects, but also suggested they would welcome Australian funding.At the Covec 4 camp, in Zumalae, dozens of Sany and Volvo heavy machinery trucks, including a dozen dump trucks, six diggers, two graders, two bulldozers and two water trucks as well as dozens of shipping containers were idle.

Covec, which is short for the Chinese Overseas Engineering Company, is a subsidiary of the China Railway Group, a Fortune 500 company, is the construction company that built stage one of the expressway.

A Chinese woman at Covec 4, who did not give her name confirmed only that 10 people were living on site now. A man who appeared to be the boss of the campsite prowled nearby, a cross look on his face as he gestured for us to leave the site.

But at the headquarters camp, Wang Qiang, 37, a structural engineer working on the Suai-Beaco highway project, who went to university "near Beijing" and has been in country for about three months spoke to The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age in halting English.Wang, who has also worked on projects in Oman, Mongolia and Tanzania, says 10 people live in headquarters camp, a dusty place with a swimming pool that has fallen into disrepair and where Timorese and Chinese flags fly in the central square.

"Maybe next week or after a few weeks, some guys will come," he says, adding "we are [the] foreign contractor for [the] highway project."

"There are four stages. This is the first. The second, third and fourth haven’t begun. We are waiting for government department to send funds," he says, adding that another company could get the go-ahead to build the project.

Asked about the collapsed section of highway, Wang blames the Indonesian designers. "We are just for construction. We do highway construction, design is for another country.Some people are working here for several years. Our company is a global contractor. We have lots of countries [where there are jobs].

He is at pains to stress that locals are employed on the project too.

"It was more than 1000 locals. We almost always use the locals as drivers, as workers, labourers. [But] if you want skilled workers, skilled labour, maybe we cannot find [among the locals]."

At the inauguration ceremony for stage one of the expressway, Chinese Ambassador to East Timor Xiao Jianguo described the project as the largest infrastructure project in East Timor's history and stressed that the winning Chinese bid was "in accordance with international biding practice and were fair, open and transparent".Xiao also described the expressway as part of China's sprawling, trillion-dollar Belt and Road initiative, which involves 70 countries in a network of infrastructure projects around much of the globe that some analysts believe are being used to grow China's soft power.

South Australian Senator Rex Patrick, who travelled with The Sydney Morning Herald and The Ageto Suai as a guest of Northern Oil Gas and Australia for an unrelated story about the company, said the "contrast between Chinese and Australian investment in Timor-Leste is stark, and particularly in the south".

"Australia’s involvement in the Tasi Maine project is non-existent. Meanwhile the Chinese are at least three years ahead of the game, already having erected power lines to connect an Indonesian-built power station, and a 32 kilometre dual-carriageway freeway," he said."China, working through construction companies that are effectively state controlled [a reference to China Railway Group's links to a state-owned enterprise], has made a strategic commitment, designed to foster long term influence in Timor-Leste."

"Australia is not just behind in the game, they are playing an entirely different game."

Edio Guterres, an Australian-educated East Timorese political analyst, who once worked for the opposition Fretilin party, said the Australian government - which spends about $100 million per year on aid to Timor - should rethink how it spends money in Timor.

"Canberra should be thinking about spending its money on different projects," he said.

"Australia has an interest in Timor Leste not going bankrupt. Probably the least Australia would want is to have another failed state on its doorstep," he said.

"I don’t know if there is any discussion in Canberra, but, in nominal terms Australia spends more money on Timor than the Chinese. The only thing is that all this money is not spent on tangible infrastructure projects as such. Australian aid assistance is not spent on a ministry of finance or defence [both of which were gifted by China], they are spent on rural roads and rural schools."

On his visit to East Timor on Friday, Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced Australia would fund the country's first fibre optic link to the world and fund an upgrade to a naval base in the north.

But in his meeting with Xanana Gusmao, the hero of Timorese independence and the most influential politician in the country, who is a leading proponent of Tasi Mane, Mr Gusmao pressed Mr Morrison on the projects.

According to a read-out from the Australian prime minister's office, "a big focus was on Gusmao’s greater sunrise vision; both agreed it was all about jobs".https://www.watoday.com.au/world/asia/big-spending-china-inc-waits-patiently-in-east-timor-on-australia-s-doorstep-20190901-p52msq.html

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Gay3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Sep 2019 at 1:50pm
Simple answer Isaac = NO nor all the 'Thanks' points which few seem to be aware of.
Experience is something you gain a few minutes after you could have used it!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Passing Through Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Sep 2019 at 1:52pm
Hey Isaac, are you hijacking this thread?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Passing Through Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Sep 2019 at 1:54pm
Courtesy of djebel



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Redemption Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Sep 2019 at 2:57pm
Originally posted by Passing Through Passing Through wrote:

I am very sympathetic to these people, I wouldn't want to live under Chinese rule, but they have had 50 years from the start of the transition and 28 left to move. I would be spending my time trying to find a country to move to...Australia maybe. 

And yet Communism is on the verge of making Hong Kongers self destruct the joint.
Typical of communism pressures. People fall apart. Good people.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Passing Through Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Sep 2019 at 2:59pm
What would you suggest people do that would lead to a practical outcome for them?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Redemption Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Sep 2019 at 4:44pm
Keep protesting.

If people in Hong Kong like their current system, why change it? Why hurt humanity?
They dont want it changed.
Why would China be so hellbent on seeing Hong Kong citizens self destruct?
What do you expect Hong Kongers do, go to some sort of "How to be a happy Communist" school??

Get Dr.Phil to pay Hong Kong a visit and explain to millions of Hong Kongers how Communism can be fun??

China needs to accept that millions of people dont want their communism and instead of denying that fact, they should use their bloody brains and utilise Hong Kong even better on the world capitalist market.

But nahhh, why do that, when you can roll over millions of people in tanks, destroying peoples happiness.

History repeating itself.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Passing Through Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Sep 2019 at 4:52pm
China isn't Communist. 60% of it's 2018 GDP came from the private sector and the private sector employed 80% of the workforce. Last year's growth was more than the value of the whole Australian economy. They have 300 billionaires. They are not communist.

The rate China is growing economically it will be bigger than Hong Kong GDP per capita by 2047. HK will be the poor relation. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote stayer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Sep 2019 at 5:41pm

Holy cow.

Edited by Gay3 - 02 Sep 2019 at 5:45pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Softy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Sep 2019 at 6:40pm
I wonder if Xi Jinping tells them private Chinese companies where to trade? ((I bet he does).
What is it called when a leader does that to a country's citizens?
And as such, the AFL are on track to go broke.
April 1 2019
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Passing Through Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Sep 2019 at 6:58pm
A mixture of Marxism and Confucianism is their social guiding principle, as Christianity is ours, but economically they have clearly almost completely transitioned into capitalism.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote stayer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Sep 2019 at 8:30pm
Economically...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dr E Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Sep 2019 at 8:34pm
Communists in sheeps clothing.
In reference to every post in the Trump thread ... "There may have been a tiny bit of license taken there" ... Ok, Thanks for the "heads up" PT!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Redemption Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Sep 2019 at 10:47pm
Originally posted by Passing Through Passing Through wrote:

A mixture of Marxism and Confucianism is their social guiding principle, as Christianity is ours, but economically they have clearly almost completely transitioned into capitalism.

Oh cool, so Hong Kong can stay as is.   Big smile
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Passing Through Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Sep 2019 at 6:38am
I would think HK is more likely to stay as it is than to change to a system China is leaving behind.

It is of more value to China as a prosperous enterprise with the looming reality China faces of falling population. They need HK, as they need their belt and road project of outsourced economic growth to work.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Isaac soloman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Sep 2019 at 11:24am
And maybe China needs to pull back on its expectations and a need to take over the world.
Live within its means.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Isaac soloman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Sep 2019 at 11:28am

Where has the ALP gone when Hong Kong needs it most?

Before I returned to my birthplace, Hong Kong, to pursue my legal career 18 years ago, I spent 15 years growing up in Melbourne, during which I was an Australian Labor Party supporter.

Even after I left Australia and no longer voted in Australian elections, I continued to cheer on the ALP from afar.

I have always been a mainstream progressive who subscribed to their message of social justice and human rights, but open to economic liberalisation.

When it comes to standing up to authoritarians, the ALP has form.

John Curtin led the fight against fascists during World War II. Ben Chifley dealt firmly with Communist-infiltrated unions. Arthur Calwell spoke firmly against Communist movements. Bob Hawke sided with the US against the Soviets, and he also granted asylum to all Chinese students in the aftermath of the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre.Kevin Rudd spoke of Australia as authoritarian China's "zhengyou", being a Chinese term for a true friend who is not afraid to express disagreements.

With such history, if there were ever to be an archetype of people with whom Labor should firmly stand, the people of Hong Kong ought to be it.

Labor has stayed silenthttps://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-09-03/where-is-alp-when-hong-kong-needs-it/11470384

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Originally posted by Passing Through Passing Through wrote:

I would think HK is more likely to stay as it is than to change to a system China is leaving behind.

It is of more value to China as a prosperous enterprise with the looming reality China faces of falling population. They need HK, as they need their belt and road project of outsourced economic growth to work.

Correct.
China needs Hong Kong, so China better get their own sh#t together and start caring about Hong Kongers, because they will justifiably burn the city down if they are further threatened.
China has to cut the crap and let Hong Kong thrive.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tlazolteotl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Sep 2019 at 5:59pm

Why China No Longer Needs Hong Kong

The mainland Chinese economy now dwarfs the city’s, and rivals are usurping its status as a hub of global finance.


https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/03/opinion/hong-kong-protest.html




For many years after regaining control of Hong Kong from Britain in 1997, China mostly respected the territory’s institutions. That is no longer the case, as Beijing’s heavy hand during the recent protests in the city has made obvious.

So what changed? In 1997, China needed Hong Kong. China had not yet been allowed to join the World Trade Organization, so Chinese exporters had limited access to the global market. Hong Kong was the solution: It served as a channel for entrepôt trade — goods from China could enter the territory’s ports and then be sent as exports from Hong Kong to the rest of the world, thus evading the trade restrictions imposed by member nations on nations outside the organization.

When China became part of the trade organization in 2001, entrepôt trade through Hong Kong lost its importance. By some estimates, nearly half of China’s trade went through Hong Kong in 1997, today that figure is less than 12 percent.

In terms of total size and wealth, Hong Kong has also shrunk relative to China, which has experienced more than three decades of astoundingly high economic growth. In 1997, Hong Kong’s economy was one-fifth the size of China’s, and its per capita income was 35 times higher. By 2018, Hong Kong’s economy was barely one-thirtieth the size of China’s. Hong Kong is still richer, but the gap is narrowing, with its per capita income now five times higher than China’s.


Hong Kong was also used as a controlled testing ground where China’s currency, the renminbi, could find its feet as an international currency. Hong Kong had the trust of international investors, and the renminbi could trade more freely there than in China, where capital controls restricted the movement of financial capital across China’s borders. China’s dependence on Hong Kong is a thing of the past. The size of China’s financial markets now dwarfs that of Hong Kong’s. China’s four largest banks have become the four largest in the world in terms of their assets. In 1997, China’s stock markets were barely half the size of Hong Kong’s stock markets. Today, the capitalization of China’s stock markets stands at nearly $8 trillion, among the largest stock markets in the world, and about double that of Hong Kong’s.

It is not that Hong Kong’s markets have shrunk — the value of new public listings in Hong Kong was higher than any other exchange worldwide last year. Rather, it is simply that China’s financial markets, like its economy, have expanded so fast they have left Hong Kong in the dust.



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Passing Through Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Sep 2019 at 6:26pm
They still only have a $US10,000 gdp per capita compared to about $US65,000 in HK, but with growth of 900% since 2000 for China, that will change quickly.

The problem China has is the one child policy has caught up with them and the change to 2 child hasn't given them the population growth they hoped for, so not far into the future(if not already) there population will start to decline quickly and with the same problem most countries have, servicing an aging population they have to expand outside their borders to maintain the growth they have enjoyed.

They have tried ''breeding'' programs bringing in Central Asian women immigrants to try to boost their population but it hasn't been very successful.

Belt and Road is their long term solution.  
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*their
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Isaac soloman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Sep 2019 at 7:54pm

How Hong Kong's protest movement is forging solidarity with Australia's Uyghurs and Tibetans

On a sunny street in the heart of Melbourne, a Uyghur woman wearing a hijab converses with a Vietnamese man dressed in bright red-and-yellow-striped bandana.

Key points:

  • Uyghurs, Tibetans and others are uniting in solidarity with Hong Kong
  • The say the Chinese Communist Party is repeating patterns of oppression
  • But pro-Beijing protesters say Hong Kong is "none of their business"

On the surface they might not have much in common, but recent events have given them a common cause — solidarity with Hong Kong protesters.

Hong Kong's long months of increasingly violent protests have galvanised disparate groups in Australia, many of whom have embittered histories with the Chinese Communist Party (CCP).

They see parallels between China's treatment of Tibet, its internment of Uyghur Muslims in Xinjiang, its "aggression" in the South China Sea, and the crisis of democracy unfolding in Hong Kong.But such solidarity, like that expressed at protests in recent weeks, is not without its sceptics.

With so many overlapping voices, some Hongkongers in Australia are resistant to muddying their five demands or having their cause hijacked by other interests.

However others say creating space for divergent views lies at the heart of Hong Kong's fight for democracy.

Someone has to speak out'

Uyghur Muslim Alim Osman said Hong Kong's plight resonates with the Uyghur community's experience — he saw parallels in China's annexation of "autonomous regions" in Xinjiang in 1949, and Tibet in 1950.

"Now they're doing it to Hong Kong," he said.

China is accused of interning up to a million Uyghurs in what Muslims call "concentration camps", but China says they are "boarding schools" that are necessary to counter terrorism."For our community it is a big risk … a lot of people are scared if they come out in public and speak out, their families and friends back home might get retaliation from the Chinese Communist Party," he said.

"I'm worried about that, but someone has to speak out."He said the solidarity went both ways — at a Uyghur event in July, many Hongkongers attended and supported them, he said.

At the same time, Mr Osman, who is the president of the Uyghur Association of Victoria, notes the nature of China's treatment of Uyghurs takes on a religious and ethnic character that is fundamentally distinct from Hong Kong's existential battle.

"The people of Hong Kong want freedom and democracy, their political rights. In our case, we are persecuted because of our religion … already we have no rights," he said.

Uyghur woman Zahira Teliwaldy said scuffles that broke out between pro-Beijing and pro-Hong Kong protesters at the University of Queensland "shook" her.he time for tunnel vision on her own group's trauma was over, she said.

"That's what we did in the past, but its too late," she said.

Today's Hong Kong is 'tomorrow's Tibet'Tibetan activist Tenzin Khangsar said the Chinese Government came into Tibet "in the name of peace and prosperity", but ultimately occupied the region with guns and tanks.

"What is happening in Hong Kong, this is what happened to Tibet," he said.

"Tibetans are living under fear. And every time Tibet protests and asks for freedom, they are put into prison and tortured and disappeared … Tibetans are burning themselves alive."

He said he felt "the same pain" and saw common cause with the Uyghurs, Vietnamese, Taiwanese and Hongkongers.

"You need to stand strong, we need to fight for your freedom. If you don't stand today, it will become like Tibet tomorrow."But he stressed Tibetans were a peaceful people, as pro-Beijing onlookers chanted "liar".

"We are not against the Chinese people. We are against the communist regime's hard-line policy," he said.

"I can see that Chinese people are brainwashed. They are innocent too."

From Vietnam to Falun GongAmong those most vocal are the Vietnamese diaspora, who chanted: "The only good communist is a dead communist"Vietnamese Community in Australia president Bon Nguyen said he wouldn't be surprised if this sentiment resonated with other victims of communist regimes.

"Of course I don't wish anyone dead … but I do wish for the regime to die, to give birth to democracy."

Mr Nguygen remembers as an 11-year-old boy being bundled onto a crowded boat, without his parents, to escape the communist north.

"We ran away from the regime, we came to Australia and we enjoy the freedom that we have here today," he said.

"We can't be too blasé about it."He said he valued being able to protest in public, saying that in China or Vietnam people would be wrested from their families, arbitrarily detained and abused by authorities.

He said he felt a particular affinity with the Tibetan people and for the Falun Gong — a spiritual group that accuses Chinese officials of arbitrarily arresting practitioners and harvesting their organs, a claim China has repeatedly denied.

'Now they know what refugees are'Hongkonger Zion Lo has been in Australia since he was 10 years old, and said there was a mixed reaction to the show of support from other groups.

"We understand they are standing in solidarity with Hong Kong, but at the same time Hong Kong people are quite traumatised," he said.

"They do need a bit of time to to build that trust and relationship with different communities in order to stand together."Mr Lo said he appreciated their support but said there were some concerns expressed online that the fiercely outspoken groups might be pushing for fully-fledged independence, when many Hongkongers advocated pro-democracy, and simply wanted the "one country, two systems" framework to be respected.

"But we are living in a democratic society. We expect people have their different opinions to be expressed … we respect that," he said.

As a social worker, he said he had worked closely with asylum seekers, and that he understood what many of the different communities had gone through to be recognised as refugees in Australia.

"I believe not all Hong Kong people have gone through that. A lot of Hong Kong people have their own pride," he said.

"They would never imagine that we have come to this stage where now people are seeking refuge from Germany because they are trying to flee Hong Kong.

"Now they know what refugees are."

He said there was a pattern of escalation that could be traced between the different groups — protesters in Hong Kong have been framed as rioters and later as "terrorists", not unlike how Tibetans, Uyghurs and the Falun Gong were painted as religious extremists, he said.

We have heard it, we have seen it, and now we are going through that," Mr Lo said.

"We are going through their past … It's our time in the history now."

'It's none of their business'Chinese national Charlie Liu has been studying design in Australia for three years, and said it was "hilarious" to see Tibetan and Uyghur groups taking part in Hong Kong pro-democracy events."It's none of their business, but if they're here, they have their own reasons. Maybe they want to add more arguments to their [cause]," he said.

"The main idea in China, of these events, is that they are naughty children," he said, likening the protesters to six-year-olds who had broken their favourite toy, and saying that China was preventing terrorism.

"People always say freedom and democracy is the only path to a modern country, but it's not always right," he said.

"It's not that China is invading Australia, which I think is stupid, because investment is not invading … If investments are invading, the whole world is invaded."

Susan Zhang became distressed by the anti-China sentiment at the rally, and began yelling: "I love China! China is my mother!"he said allegations that Falun Gong members were tortured were "fake".

"My mother, my sister and my friends were all Falun Gong practitioners," she said.

"When China ruled it as an illegal anti-government organisation, they all stopped practising and they were all fine."

"If the Australian Government says something is illegal, you shouldn't do it. Otherwise the police will take you away and put you in prison. There is no doubt about that."

She said some of the protesters were "anti-China" and criticised them for "interfering in our country's internal affairs".

"Every country in the world knows there is only one China. Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau are all parts of China," she said.

"Their event makes me feel sick."

The Chinese embassy in Australia and consulate in Melbourne were approached for comment but did not respond by deadlinehttps://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-09-07/hong-kong-solidarity-in-australia-with-uyghurs-tibetans-diaspora/11420386

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Passing Through Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Sep 2019 at 11:51am
''Peaceful'' protesters throwing petrol bombs and bricks. 

This is going well. Thumbs Up

Police in Hong Kong have used water cannon and tear gas against protesters throwing petrol bombs and bricks near government offices in the city.

The violence broke out after thousands of pro-democracy demonstrators marched in defiance of a police ban.

Earlier hundreds rallied outside the British Consulate, demanding the UK press China to maintain freedoms guaranteed during the 1997 handover.

Months of unrest were sparked by a now-scrapped extradition bill.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-49705988

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Redemption Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Sep 2019 at 5:30pm
Yep, this is what happens when Commies attack.  Divide and conquer. Good ole commie rule.
Hong Kongers left to fight for themselves, with sticks and stones.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote stayer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Sep 2019 at 6:29pm
Interesting that it's trendy to say the HK protests are a bad thing.
"She's going through a growth phase." - GW
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Isaac soloman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Yesterday at 10:48am
Who watched 4 Corners about fake news.
Thank goodness for society up loads of vision otherwise the world would never know the real truth.

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